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Take Away Teaching Ideas #9

I Wish That I Had Duck Feet

I wish that I had duck feet

By Dr Seuss

A young boy weighs the pros and cons of possessing various animal appendages–such as a duck’s feet, a deer’s antlers, a whale’s spout, an elephant’s trunk, and a long, long tail–only to decide that he’s better off just being himself. A zany, insightful story that beginning readers will wish to hear again and again.

 

Such a fun story to share!

 

You can view the story HERE. 

 

Here are my top 20 teaching ideas for you! (In no particular order)

  1. Create a mobile of all the rhyming words. Use colour coding the show the rhyming words.
  2. Use instruments and everyday objects to create a sound scape to match a scene in the book
  3. Think, turn and talk: If you could have one wish from the story, which would you choose? Why?
  4. Lucky dip an animal toy from a bag. What would be your wish? Draw your idea.
  5. Using a photo of yourself had an animal feature.
  6. Make some duck feet from cardboard or material. Tie onto your ankles or shoes and experience having duck feet. What did you find out?
  7. Create a long, long tail. How can you measure your tail? How will you record the measurements?
  8. Can you write the word SPLASH as an onomatopoeia? (The formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named) Can you find some other suitable words in the book?
  9. Make a list of all the wishes from the book. Survey your friends to find out the most popular wish.
  10. Play charades to show animal movements and features.
  11. What is the purpose of the hyphen in the name Which-What-Who?
  12. Create a Y chart to describe the Which-What-Who.
  13. What do you think the message of the story is? Make a poster to share the message.
  14. Create a T chart to explore the pros and cons of all the animal features.


    Animal Feature:

    Pro:

    Con:

    Deer Horns

    Carrying lots of things with you

    Tricky to get into doorways

    Elephant Trunk

    Playing on the playground

    Washing things at home



  15. Collect images of animals and create your own animal by selecting features from different animals. What is your animal called? What would be a good story to match your animal?
  16. Create a 3D scene for one settings in the book.
  17. Collect up to fifteen words from the book and sort them as nouns, verbs and adjectives. What did you find?
  18. Select your favourite page from the book and practise reading fluently. Video your reading.
  19. Find some animal facts in the book called Actual Size by Steve Jenkins.

    Actual size
  20. Add talk and think bubbles to the pages of the book. What would be inside those bubbles?

Teaching Ideas



Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #8

Numerical Street

Book by Antonia Pesenti and Hilary Bell

‘Starting with 1, begin in the park: Count up the street and get home before dark.’ From the creators of the bestselling Alphabetical Sydney comes a counting book set in a bright and quirky streetscape where there’s always something new to find.


I am so incredibly grateful to have collaborated with Joel Brian and Carly White @misswhitesclassroom

Thank you for your time and enthusiasm!

Reading:

This book provides the perfect opportunity for readers to:

  • Examine the pictures to make predictions
  • Make connections to their own experiences
  • Make connections to other texts that involve shopping – “Don’t’ Forget the Bacon” by Pat Hutchins
  • Investigate the use of the hyphen
  • Define and add the mathematical terms to the classroom word wall
  • Sort words from the book according to the number of syllables
  • Explore rhyming words
  • Read the signs in the book and then search for signs in the community
  • Explore compound words

Writing:

This book inspires writers to:

  • Write their own mathematical story
  • Write a description of one the stores
  • Point around the pictures and talk about the writing ideas from the book
  • Recount a personal experience
  • Innovate the story
  • Discuss the illustration style and  transfer to their own text
  • Investigate the binding of the book (numbers presented in the spine)

Mathematics:

This is a great book for mathematicians to:

  • Search for numbers throughout the book
  • Count the mathematical terms
  • Subitise the fish and sea life in the tropical fish tanks
  • Explore ordinal numbers
  • Create number lines
  • Investigate simple fractions
  • Collect keys or other objects to classify by size
  • Identify, count, and sketch shapes in the book

  • Create patterns as presented in the Upholstery Store
  • Search for money amounts in the book and write facts for the money amounts

So many teaching ideas

  • Plan, create and use a classroom shop
  • Photograph and sketch the numbers on the letter boxes in your street and investigate the number of the numbers
  • Make a number line and order the places in the story
  • Create a diorama of a store to model a collection

  • Visit the local shop to purchase and prepare a snack
  • Invite people to your classroom that work in the different stores
  • Make a soundscape to match the scenes
  • Create signs for your classroom

Check out my new product in my store!!

It is all about dominoes:

8 open ended, hands on tasks

material lists and instructions

7 instructional videos

strategies to differentiate

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching Ideas #9

I Wish That I Had Duck Feet

I wish that I had duck feet

By Dr Seuss

A young boy weighs the pros and cons of possessing various animal appendages–such as a duck’s feet, a deer’s antlers, a whale’s spout, an elephant’s trunk, and a long, long tail–only to decide that he’s better off just being himself. A zany, insightful story that beginning readers will wish to hear again and again.

 

Such a fun story to share!

 

You can view the story HERE. 

 

Here are my top 20 teaching ideas for you! (In no particular order)

  1. Create a mobile of all the rhyming words. Use colour coding the show the rhyming words.
  2. Use instruments and everyday objects to create a sound scape to match a scene in the book
  3. Think, turn and talk: If you could have one wish from the story, which would you choose? Why?
  4. Lucky dip an animal toy from a bag. What would be your wish? Draw your idea.
  5. Using a photo of yourself had an animal feature.
  6. Make some duck feet from cardboard or material. Tie onto your ankles or shoes and experience having duck feet. What did you find out?
  7. Create a long, long tail. How can you measure your tail? How will you record the measurements?
  8. Can you write the word SPLASH as an onomatopoeia? (The formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named) Can you find some other suitable words in the book?
  9. Make a list of all the wishes from the book. Survey your friends to find out the most popular wish.
  10. Play charades to show animal movements and features.
  11. What is the purpose of the hyphen in the name Which-What-Who?
  12. Create a Y chart to describe the Which-What-Who.
  13. What do you think the message of the story is? Make a poster to share the message.
  14. Create a T chart to explore the pros and cons of all the animal features.


    Animal Feature:

    Pro:

    Con:

    Deer Horns

    Carrying lots of things with you

    Tricky to get into doorways

    Elephant Trunk

    Playing on the playground

    Washing things at home



  15. Collect images of animals and create your own animal by selecting features from different animals. What is your animal called? What would be a good story to match your animal?
  16. Create a 3D scene for one settings in the book.
  17. Collect up to fifteen words from the book and sort them as nouns, verbs and adjectives. What did you find?
  18. Select your favourite page from the book and practise reading fluently. Video your reading.
  19. Find some animal facts in the book called Actual Size by Steve Jenkins.

    Actual size
  20. Add talk and think bubbles to the pages of the book. What would be inside those bubbles?

Teaching Ideas



Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #8

Numerical Street

Book by Antonia Pesenti and Hilary Bell

‘Starting with 1, begin in the park: Count up the street and get home before dark.’ From the creators of the bestselling Alphabetical Sydney comes a counting book set in a bright and quirky streetscape where there’s always something new to find.


I am so incredibly grateful to have collaborated with Joel Brian and Carly White @misswhitesclassroom

Thank you for your time and enthusiasm!

Reading:

This book provides the perfect opportunity for readers to:

  • Examine the pictures to make predictions
  • Make connections to their own experiences
  • Make connections to other texts that involve shopping – “Don’t’ Forget the Bacon” by Pat Hutchins
  • Investigate the use of the hyphen
  • Define and add the mathematical terms to the classroom word wall
  • Sort words from the book according to the number of syllables
  • Explore rhyming words
  • Read the signs in the book and then search for signs in the community
  • Explore compound words

Writing:

This book inspires writers to:

  • Write their own mathematical story
  • Write a description of one the stores
  • Point around the pictures and talk about the writing ideas from the book
  • Recount a personal experience
  • Innovate the story
  • Discuss the illustration style and  transfer to their own text
  • Investigate the binding of the book (numbers presented in the spine)

Mathematics:

This is a great book for mathematicians to:

  • Search for numbers throughout the book
  • Count the mathematical terms
  • Subitise the fish and sea life in the tropical fish tanks
  • Explore ordinal numbers
  • Create number lines
  • Investigate simple fractions
  • Collect keys or other objects to classify by size
  • Identify, count, and sketch shapes in the book

  • Create patterns as presented in the Upholstery Store
  • Search for money amounts in the book and write facts for the money amounts

So many teaching ideas

  • Plan, create and use a classroom shop
  • Photograph and sketch the numbers on the letter boxes in your street and investigate the number of the numbers
  • Make a number line and order the places in the story
  • Create a diorama of a store to model a collection

  • Visit the local shop to purchase and prepare a snack
  • Invite people to your classroom that work in the different stores
  • Make a soundscape to match the scenes
  • Create signs for your classroom

Check out my new product in my store!!

It is all about dominoes:

8 open ended, hands on tasks

material lists and instructions

7 instructional videos

strategies to differentiate

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

pig the tourist

Take Away Teaching Ideas #6

Pig the Tourist

By Aaron Blabey

View the book trailer Here

Enjoy the read aloud  Here 

This week I had to pleasure to collaborate with the Educators at Yarraville SDS!

Thanks to everyone for professionalism and engagement in the Professional Learning sessions.

We considered all the literacy learning opportunities for this text.

In preparation for our session together I implemented a ‘Book Walk’.  

This enables me to consider all learning opportunities to use the text as a

springboard to engage the learners in my classroom.

Watch the video to find out how!

These are teaching ideas I generated following my ‘Book Walk’:

  • Hook the students into the text by:
  • Open up a suitcase to find the book
  • Pig the Pug toy
  • Listening to the sound of a dog barking
  • Photo of yourself or colleague with their dog.
  • Investigate the rhyming words – away, say, day, play, stay
  • Creating a simple icy pole stick puppet of Pig The Pug to read along the text with you!
  • Have fun reading the text GO AWAY! and videoing the students.
  • Lean on the pictures by investigating the objects that appear in the illustrations.
  • Activate prior knowledge and predict Pig the Pugs behaviour.
  • Make connections to other Pig the Pug adventures.

  • Search for the piranhas in the illustrations and make connections to the piranhas in a different text.

Innovation of the Story:

Story innovation takes a text and allows the students to change characters, setting, and story elements to make a personalised version of the story.

Some suggestions are:

  • The character could become the student, teacher, another animal or their pet.
  • Food trolley – What could Pig be travelling in?
  • Egypt – What is another location? Where could Pig the Pug be at our school? Where could Pig the Pug be in the community?
  • Swimwear – What could Pig the Pug be wearing?
  • Piranhas – What else could bite Pig’s bottom?

What learning experience would engage your students?

I adore reading texts about dogs! A favourite of mine is Ted by Leila Rudge. I have teaching ideas based on this text available.

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching Ideas #5

Mix It Up

Mix it up!

By Hervé Tullet

A BIG shout out to Michael and Sarah Chapple for contributing ideas to this Take Away.

I appreciate your generosity!

You can view the Mix It Up text here

Reading:

This story provides the perfect opportunity to read aloud and respond to punctuation.

Writing:

I have used this as a mentor text for writing instructions to engage the audience. It provides many examples of the use of question marks.

Mathematics:

This is a great book is ideal to explore colour, shape, and pattern.

Physical Education:

This is a great opportunity for students to use movement in different ways: drawing, tracing, stepping, jumping, and leaping as well as quick decision making.

Check out the teaching ideas we have planned for you!

  • Go on a Word Treasure Hunt! Find how many times the word – they or little – appeared in the book?
  • Make a list of two letter words that you know.
  • Have a book look for words with the letter x as in mix.
  • Select two of your favourite pages and practise reading fluently.
  • How do you read a sentence with a question mark? Quotation marks? Full stop?
  • Mix it Up! explores actions such as smudge, rub and shake. Create a foldable book to show actions you do in a day.

mix it up!

  • I wonder how many spots are in this book. Make a tally chart or pictograph and record how many different coloured dots there are on a page.
  • Collect objects or take photographs of things you have at home that are the same as the colours in this book.
  • Collect ten things and sort by colour.
  • Using the different colours in this book, how many patterns can you create?
  • What wonderings do you have about colours? Record your wonderings on a T chart. See if you can answer your wonderings.

wonderings and answers

  • Have a go at mixing some of the colours yourself. You could put spots on a page just like in the story or mix colours on a large piece of paper.
  • Introduce the colour wheel to the students.
  • Investigate recipes. What do you need to mix up in the recipe?
  • What questions would you ask Hervé Tullet about this book?
  • Play the game “Mirror Me!” Students are to draw coloured circles on the ground facing each other. Trace around their feet in the middle. One person is the colour master and jumps to a coloured circle. Their partner has 2 seconds to match the same colour on their board otherwise their opponent wins a point. First to 10 points is the winner. Swap roles. They can include maths by keeping a tally chart of their wins.

                     

  • A different version of the game above except it is played with your hands. Students use coloured paper and their hands. One person is the colour master and creates a 3-4 colour pattern while their partner copies the same pattern to stay in the game. For example: Colour Master – red, green, pink.

@learning through movement

  • Get the kids moving through designing their own movement course. All you need is chalk, a sidewalk and lots of creativity.

  • Have the students assign the colours in the book with a movement challenge. Every time the colour appears, they must do the action 10 times.

I enjoy following Michael on Instagram and I learn heaps!

 

@pe_with_mr_c

If you like to use picture story books to plan mathematical experiences, I have an online resource that lists 40+ picture story book titles with author and the Mathematics learning focuses for each title.

No products found which match your selection.

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

lest we forget

Take Away Teaching Ideas #4

Lest We Forget

By Kerry Brown

lest we forget

A young boy visits his granddad and thinks about the important days in his life: his first day of school, playing soccer with his team, the day his baby sister was born. Yet through the illustrations the reader sees a parallel story of the grandfather’s experiences at war: wearing his brand-new soldier’s uniform, with his fellow diggers in the field, looking at a photo of the baby he’s never met.

I am grateful to have collaborated with Joel Brian

and Carly White @misswhitesclassroom 

You can view the story at  here

Reading:

This book links to the comprehension strategies of inferring, comparing and contrasting.

Writing:

A mentor text for a narrative that includes flashbacks and the use of illustrations to convey meaning.

Mathematics:

This is a great book is a great springboard to explore the use of calendars.

The three of us have collaborated to plan these teaching ideas for you!

  • Before reading the text brainstorm what Lest We Forget
  • What can we learn from the front cover?
  • What does ANZAC stand for?
  • Create a Venn diagram by drawing two overlapping circle or pasting two paper plates. Compare the ‘then’ and ‘now’ pictures. What is the same? What is different?
  • Why did the author Kerry present the book in this way?
  • Select five words that relate to the text to make a word collage. You may use words and letters from catalogues, newspapers or magazines.
  • How do we find out about the grandfather’s past? Look closely at the illustrations and list what you see. Why was there no text with these pictures?
  • Can you make a connection to another text? What text is it?
  • Make a calendar and record dates that are important to you and your family. Each month could have a special picture to match either a: season, moment, or special event.
  • Provide the students with a month of the calendar cut up as a jigsaw to solve.
  • Make a patty pan poppy. you can find the instructions at

http://www.beafunmum.com/2014/04/anzac-day-craft-how-to-make-a-paper-poppy/ 

  • Create an artwork using images to show your understanding for celebration and commemoration.
  • Make ANZAC biscuits following recipe students can write their own instructional text.
  • Visit Art for kids Hub and follow instructions on how to draw poppies.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkSBztJ_bMQ 

  • Begin to create your own memory capsule. What will you use? What will be your first memory to be stored?

Another great, engaging book to use with your students is ‘ANZAC Day Parade’ –

check it out on my online resource section  here

ANZAC day parade             ANZAC Day Parade

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching Ideas #2

My Dad STILL thinks he’s funny

By Katrina Germein

Illustrations by Tom Jellett

This series of books are fun to read and make you laugh!

Story Box Library features the book – My Dad STILL thinks he’s funny!

https://storyboxlibrary.com.au/stories/my-dad-thinks-hes-funny

A BIG shout out to Courtney Trigg for contributing ideas to this Take Away!

Reading:

This story provides the perfect opportunity to read aloud and respond to punctuation.

Writing:

I have used this as a mentor text for collecting and generating ideas, text matching pictures to support comprehension and punctuation.

Mathematics:

This is a great book to collect and represent data about the favourite joke in the story.

Courtney and I have collaborated to plan these teaching ideas for you!

  • Use a photograph or a drawing of your Dad/special person and list all the things you love doing with them! How many can you come up with?
  • Select your favourite jokes from the book to perform to an audience.
  • Create props to support your performance.
  • Make a video of your performance.
  • Which joke did you like the best? Were there any that you didn’t understand? Do you think the boy likes his dad’s jokes? Why or why not? What did the boy do at the end?
  • Research different kinds of jokes, riddles, puns, pranks, limericks, etc.
  • Investigate and read joke books.
  • Make and publish your own joke book.
  • Investigate the compound words in the story. How many did you find?
  • Katrina uses puns in her story. Can you provide an example from the story and an explanation? How would define the term ‘pun’ to support other writers?
  • Find out more about Katrina by reading the interview here
  • Create a Y chart to describe one of the jokes/illustrations in the story.
  • Tom has created an illustration to build understanding of the jokes. This is one example. What page is your favourite? Why?

  • Find out more about Tom by reading the interview here
  • How would you describe Tom’s style of illustrations? Try this technique.
  • Create a 3D scene for one of the jokes.
  • Publish a joke to support the reader’s understanding.
  • In the story the boy receives a special card from his Gran. Create a card for someone special to you!
  • Write a text to persuade your audience that Dad jokes are essential!
  • Compare two stories written by Katrina. What is the same in these stories and what is different?

Enjoy and take care,

Take Away Teaching Ideas #1

Clive Eats Alligators

By Alison Lester

This is a story of seven characters and all the things that make them unique!

It is such a thrill to listen to Alison read her book that she wrote 35 years ago! 

Follow the link and you will find the read aloud here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1y-cuRG0WZBNIYxaE-WxQ

Reading:

This book links strongly to the comprehension strategies of making connections and summarising.

Writing:

I have used this as a mentor text for generating and collecting ideas, conventions and publishing.

Mathematics:

This is a great book to explore different events and connections to the times of the day.

Alison’s read aloud has inspired the following teaching ideas that I would like to share with you!

o Draw images or write a description of your favourite character. (My favourite character is Frank!) Share your clues and see if your buddy can guess your favourite character.

o Create a T chart to compare two characters.

Ernie                                                                                                     Rosie

 Eats porridge for breakfast                                                             Likes bacon and eggs

o Create a word splash to represent a character in the book or an event such as breakfast, getting dressed or shopping. Use colour, size and shape to represent the meaning of the words.

o Match or label times of the day that would be reasonable for the events. What time would breakfast be?

o Create a mobile using words and images to recall one character in the story.

o Collect objects or images that appear in the story and sort by character.

o Play ‘character heads’ using the characters from the text.
https://www.kidspot.com.au/things-to-do/activity-articles/celebrity-heads-game/news-story/6ad11b34e53678beaa8db7f832f7709e

o Go on a word treasure hunt! How many times the word – has- appeared in the book?

o Design, make and wear a tail like Tessa.

o On the front cover of the book Alison used a background of alligators to provide clues about Clive. Can you create a page about yourself? what would your background be?

o Photograph events in your day to create a book.

o Nicky likes to build. What can you build? What materials did you use? Sketch and label your building.

o Create a foldable book to describe a character or yourself!

o Select three characters and record the key ideas about each character on a grid.

o Cut up the grid and recall the story by classifying the terms according to the characters.

o Frank likes to play chess with his dog Rodger. What games do you like to play? Can you write instructions, make a video or draw a diagram to explain how to play your favourite game?

Enjoy and take care,