Posts

Take Away Teaching Ideas #31

An Aussie Year: Twelve Months in the Life of Australian Kids

Tania McCartney and Tina Snerling

 

I had the pleasure of travelling to Dimboola PS and collaborating with many teachers from the district. I was introduced to this amazing book. I loved it straight away – so many teaching ideas.  There are lots of questions in the book that you can investigate with your students.



‘An Aussie Year’ is a picture book bursting with national pride. It is a snapshot of who we are as a nation, covering our modern day culture, lifestyle and traditions. It’s pages feature trailing, meandering text, dates and gorgeous illustrations showing our five Aussie children at play, at school, at home, and enjoying their parts of Australia – from the tropical north out to our rugged west and beautiful Tassie.’

 

January:

How far can you throw a Frisbee? How would you measure the distance?

How long does it take for ice to melt in the sun? Conduct an experiment.

What games do you like playing with tennis balls?

February:

How do most students in your class get to school?

What can you create to celebrate Chinese New Year?

What could be your design of your backpack for school?

March:

How could you promote Earth hour?

What could you wear on St. Patrick’s Day?

What colours and materials will you need to create a friendship bracelet?

April:

What facts can you find out about a Bilby?

What are the ingredients and the method to bake ANZAC biscuits?

May:

How many animals are presented on this page? What facts do you know about this number?

How will you order the animals by size?

How can you find out the most popular animal in your class?

June:

What can you find out about Mabo Day?

What football team do you follow? What do you like about your team?

What materials will you need to create an artwork of a rainbow?

July:

What is your favourite knock, knock joke? Practice it to present to the class.

What do you have in your lunch box today? Write a description for other people to guess the contents.

Where is the Great Barrier Reef? How would you travel there?

August:

What dream time stories can you find? Which story is your favourite? Why?

What notes and coins would you need to purchase your favourite treat?

What can we use to make a model of a boat that floats?

September:

What is wattle? Draw or photograph wattle. Can you describe it using your senses?

What is your favourite way to eat eggs?

What colours and shapes will you use to design and create your own flag?

October:

What is an Akubra? Where can you research some information?

What message of thank you would you write to your teacher to celebrate World Teacher’s Day?

What is daylight saving? How would you use a clock to explain?

What fruit do you love to eat?

November:

What is the significance of the red poppy? What artwork can you create to share this message?

What information can you find about National Recycling Week? What plans can you make for your family, class, or school?

What are your favourite animals to view at the zoo? Why?

December:

What would be on your menu for Christmas Day? What will your budget need to be?

What is the average temperature for this month? Make comparisons to another country.

What present do you hope to receive at Christmas? Why?

 

Take care everyone!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

P.S. I am so fortunate to be heading back to Dimboola PS for another day of professional learning on Friday, 30th July 2021! Check out the details below, you may wish to come along!

 

What does a great mathematics lesson look and sound like?

 

Everyone will receive a teaching resource of the warmup games, hooks, rich tasks, engaging games, strategies to differentiate, reflection tools, websites and more!

Andrea will share these teaching ideas using objects, photographs, modelling, doing, and reflecting.

This day is highly interactive! Be prepared to get involved.

Together we will explore the following questions:

  • What is the structure?

  • How do I build in ‘mathematical talk’?

  • What are quality tasks?

  • How do I support my mathematicians to reflect?

You will need to bring along a small gift box with a lid as we are creating a number box!

Suitable for primary school teachers of mathematicians in Levels F-6

Email Greg for details and to enrol Greg.Sampson@education.vic.gov.au

Take Away Teaching Ideas #30

Pig the Pug

Aaron Blabey

 

Who can resist Pig the Pug and Trevor? Not me!

A big shout out to Stacey at Manor Lakes as I recently enjoyed sharing this book with her students.

 

Here are twenty ideas to take away!

  1. Introduce the book using picture of Pig the Pug to create a jigsaw for the students to solve.

  2. Shared reading of the text inviting the students to read the rhyming words.

  3. Create and perform a Trevor and Pig the Pug puppet show.

  4. Vote and then justify your preference of character – Pig or Trevor.

I use cups and sticks to vote.

  1. View below.


     



  2. Explore phrases: Flipped his wig. Pigs can’t fly. I won’t and I swear!

  3. Investigate the meaning of words: Selfish, scoot, swine, loot.

  4. Create a garland of words from the text. Display in alphabetical order.

  5. Create a Can/Has/Like Chart.



  6. Create an ‘I Spy’ jar using pictures from the text.

  7. Make Trevor or Pig using play dough and care for him. Keep a journal.

  8. View Youtube clip and then draw own Pig the Pug.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hB-nunxTLT8

  9. Make a stocking Trevor the sausage dog. What other materials can you use?

  10. Write another Pig adventure. Follow up with reading Pig the Fibber.

  11. Write rules for Pig the Pug to follow. Make an instruction video.

  12. Add another animal to the story and write a different adventure.

  13. Write the story from Trevor’s point of view.

  14. Caption this! What is Trevor and Pig the Pug thinking and saying?

  15. Research the two dog breeds and compare. Use the precise vocabulary in a review.

  16. Investigate other dog stories!

 

My favourite is an Alison Lester book…

Added extra! Check out the teaching idea at:

 

https://andreahillbrick.com.au/the-wonder-of-words/

 

Enjoy!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Book Club:

Have you joined yet?

Check out the details at:

https://andreahillbrick.com.au/shop-online-resources/book-club-2/ 

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

 

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #29

BUTLEIGH FARM

Written by Di Hickleton

Illustrated by Melanie Macilwain

 

View Di’s website – www.butleighfarm.com.au

 

I have had the pleasure of knowing Di for many years!

It is so exciting to have Di collect and generate engaging ideas from her beautiful picture story book and for me to share them with you!

 

Thank you, Di, for preparing the Take Away Teaching Ideas #29

 

 

READING:

BOOK INTRODUCTION AND DISCUSSION ABOUT PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

So many questions could be asked …..…….

“What do you think the book is about?”

“Why would these animals be chosen for the front cover?”

“What other animals might you see on a farm?”

“Where do you think this farm might be?”

“Unusual name for a farm. Do you think the illustration on the back cover has anything to do with it’s name?”

“How do you think the animals might work together?”

“What things could animals possibly help with on a farm?”

“Why do you think there is a shovel on the dedication page?”

“What secrets could the animals have?”

“Is Murgheboluc a real place?”

Watch the Book Trailer:

 

 

 

READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

So many questions and connections can be made throughout and at the end.

“What wonderings do you have after reading?”

Put questions, connections, and wonderings on sticky notes during and after reading.

Display and discuss.

 

“Is Butleigh Farm a real place?”

“Do you think the animals are real or made up?”

“Why would Di have put can you guess who else lives on Butleigh Farm? on the last page?”

“What might be this character’s name?”

 

AFTER READING ACTIVITY IDEAS

Text to Self – share a story about yourself that is related to a story or character in the book.

 

Record yourself reading Butleigh Farm. Remember to read fluently, with expression and at a good pace.

WRITING:

FOCUS ON THE 6+1 TRAITS OF WRITING

Critique the book using the trait checklists below.

Use them for your own writing following through each of the traits.

READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

“Does Butleigh Farm have a Bold Beginning?”

“Does it hook you in to read more?”

Compare it with other books.    Make an anchor chart.

Write a different beginning to Butleigh Farm.

 

Repeat for Mighty Middles and Excellent Endings

 

“Do the animals have personalities?”

“Which is your favourite?”   “Why?”

“Could you think of other words to describe the animals?”

Look at your own writing.

“Do you get a feeling that the reader will really know your characters?”

 

Look at the Meet the Characters page under Books on the website.

www.butleighfarm.com.au

 

AFTER READING ACTIVITY IDEAS

Make your own book trailer for a book you have written or a book you really enjoy reading.

“What are the important things to include?”

 

Make a class set of Character Cards.

“What are everyone’s likes, favourite food, favourite song, etc.

 

Research a farm animal.

Present a poster, PowerPoint presentation, etc about what you found out.

Include interesting facts, features, habitat, care needed, food, importance on a farm, etc.

 

Write a letter to Di or Mel telling them some of your questions or wonderings.

 

Bubbles and clouds – Using speech bubbles/ thinking clouds and pictures of the Butleigh Farm characters, draw a conversation between two of the characters.

 

MATHEMATICS:

SUBITISE

“Look fast with your eyes and subitise”.

– apples on page

– windmill blades

 

PROBLEM SOLVING

e.g.     If there are 3 different types of farm animals in the top paddock with a total of 24 legs, what animals could they be and how many of each?

 

MAPPING

  • birds eye view
  • directions

Design a map of what your farm would look like and include if you had one.

 

Look at the Explore the Farm page under Books on the website.

www.butleighfarm.com.au

MEASUREMENT

  • perimeter
  • area
  • time – o’clock / half past
  • timelines

e.g.  – 6 o’clock – Bonnie barks at chook house

– 7 o’clock – Nanny comes outside

– 7:30am – Pa’s coffee is ready

“When do other daily events happen?”

“What times / routines do you have at home?”

“Would the animals have same bedtimes as you?”

 

SHAPE

2D – plan a farm (see above)

3D – build a farm (Lego, blocks, cardboard, nets)

 

COUNTING

by 1s, 2s, etc

forwards and backwards

  • apples (end pages)
  • windmill blades
  • flying birds
  • chickens
  • eggs
  • sheep in paddocks –

feet, tails, eyes, etc

  • fence posts
  • stairs
  • verandah posts
  • garden beds
  • flowers
  • spots on Nanny’s gumboots
  • stripes on Nanny’s top
  • fence palings on front gate
  • apples (complete book)
  • sheep (complete book)
  • shovels

 

STEM:

FARM MACHINARY

“What machinery / tools would you find on a farm?”

  • how do they work?
  • what do they do?

 

MATERIALS

– building animal enclosures – strength / waterproof / etc.

 

HABITATS

“What other animals could live at Butleigh Farm?”

“What would they need to be happy and comfortable?”

Design your own farm.

“What animals would you have?”

“What food would you have to buy / grow?”

– Sustainability!

 

ART:

“Do you think Mel has captured the animal’s characteristics in her illustrations?”

“Would you change how they look?”

Do some sketches of the animals.

Explore different mediums to create unique characters for your illustrations.

“Could this book be illustrated using only 4 colours like in Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion?”

Explore using different colours.

“Does it change the feel of the book?”

 

TEACHING FOCUS:

Butleigh Farm can be used for many specific teaching focuses. Check out the extensive list of examples below.

Finally …………

 

DID YOU FIND THE SHOVEL ON EVERY DOUBLE PAGE?

 

Enjoy and take care.

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching Ideas #27

Back to School Tortoise

Lucy M George

 

Happy New Year Everyone!

Every time I share this story the audience LOVES the ending! An awesome book to share on the first day of school with colleagues and students.

 

The story is about a tortoise who is afraid of going back to school. The tortoise is being brave and resilient, with a surprise at the end!

 

View the story below:

 

 

Real Thing:

Investigate, observe, draw, feel and create a tortoise.

Check out the ideas at this blog!

http://mrsmyerskindergarten.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/inquiring-about-tortoises.html

 

Sensory Tray:

Collect objects and present them on a tray so the students can use the five senses to gain an understanding of the story.

 

Picture match with the objects in the text such as the objects on the breakfast table.

Explore the mathematics about breakfast:

  • What time of the day is it?
  • What do you do before and after?
  • How many things do you eat?
  • What is your favourite breakfast food?
  • How much does your breakfast cost?

 

Make an alphabet book related to the story or your first day/week at school. Did you include mathematical terms?

 

Words around us:

Match the words from the text to environmental print in the classroom.

Add words from the story to the classroom word wall. Use the words in your writing.

 

Count words:

Rewrite a sentence/s from the story for the students to count the words. The students put a counter on each word.

 

We are going on a T hunt:

Tortoise begins with ‘t’! Provide each student with a letter ‘t’ attached to an icy pole stick. Search for the letter in the classroom, in books or in students’ names.

 

What’s in the box?

Inside the box is a tortoise mask. What animal do you think is in the box? The animal is the main character in our story. Read the factual clues to help you make a prediction.

If you would like these clues for this learning experience send me a request via email: andrea@andreahillbrick.com.au

 

Do the book:

Act out being the tortoise wearing your school bag.

Using a clothes basket move like a tortoise.

 

Create a sound scape for the story. This involves the students using musical instruments or everyday items to create sound effects for pages in the book.

 

Picture Retell:

Retell the story by sequencing the images.

Puppets:

Excite your students about the text using a tortoise puppet. The students can retell the text aloud using the puppet.

 

Text to self-connections:

When have you been brave? How did you feel? What helped you?

 

Text to self connections:

How do you feel about returning to school? What advice would you give Mr Tortoise?

 

Text to text connections:

Was the tortoise brave in this story? What was the same in the two stories? What is different? Do you know another story that had a brave character?

View the text below:

 

Innovate the text:

 

What would be a different ending to this story?

What other animals could be in the story? How would it change the story?

Can you rewrite the story as you as the main character?

What could be a different setting, problem, and resolution for Mr Tortoise?

 

Launch your 100 days of School count! Begin with a display of ten empty tens frames. Add an adhesive dot each day!

Create a survey to find out everyone’s favourite lunch at school. Graph the results.

Research the differences between a tortoise and turtle. How will you share this information?

 

Have a great start to your school year!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

NEW FOR 2021:

 

Book Club:

Have you joined yet? First teaching resource will arrive to you on the 17th January!

Check out the details by clicking on the link below.

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

 

Upcoming Webinar:  Writer’s Notebook

During the webinar Andrea will:

  • Explore key ideas related to generating and collecting ideas in a Writer’s Notebook.
  • Investigate four detailed lessons plans with images of examples
  • Provide strategies to differentiate
  • Share HHH – Hillbrick Handy Hints!

Each participant will receive a teaching resource with four detailed lesson plans and strategies to differentiate. The lessons are designed to be implemented the ‘very next day!’

Take Away Teaching Ideas #31

An Aussie Year: Twelve Months in the Life of Australian Kids

Tania McCartney and Tina Snerling

 

I had the pleasure of travelling to Dimboola PS and collaborating with many teachers from the district. I was introduced to this amazing book. I loved it straight away – so many teaching ideas.  There are lots of questions in the book that you can investigate with your students.



‘An Aussie Year’ is a picture book bursting with national pride. It is a snapshot of who we are as a nation, covering our modern day culture, lifestyle and traditions. It’s pages feature trailing, meandering text, dates and gorgeous illustrations showing our five Aussie children at play, at school, at home, and enjoying their parts of Australia – from the tropical north out to our rugged west and beautiful Tassie.’

 

January:

How far can you throw a Frisbee? How would you measure the distance?

How long does it take for ice to melt in the sun? Conduct an experiment.

What games do you like playing with tennis balls?

February:

How do most students in your class get to school?

What can you create to celebrate Chinese New Year?

What could be your design of your backpack for school?

March:

How could you promote Earth hour?

What could you wear on St. Patrick’s Day?

What colours and materials will you need to create a friendship bracelet?

April:

What facts can you find out about a Bilby?

What are the ingredients and the method to bake ANZAC biscuits?

May:

How many animals are presented on this page? What facts do you know about this number?

How will you order the animals by size?

How can you find out the most popular animal in your class?

June:

What can you find out about Mabo Day?

What football team do you follow? What do you like about your team?

What materials will you need to create an artwork of a rainbow?

July:

What is your favourite knock, knock joke? Practice it to present to the class.

What do you have in your lunch box today? Write a description for other people to guess the contents.

Where is the Great Barrier Reef? How would you travel there?

August:

What dream time stories can you find? Which story is your favourite? Why?

What notes and coins would you need to purchase your favourite treat?

What can we use to make a model of a boat that floats?

September:

What is wattle? Draw or photograph wattle. Can you describe it using your senses?

What is your favourite way to eat eggs?

What colours and shapes will you use to design and create your own flag?

October:

What is an Akubra? Where can you research some information?

What message of thank you would you write to your teacher to celebrate World Teacher’s Day?

What is daylight saving? How would you use a clock to explain?

What fruit do you love to eat?

November:

What is the significance of the red poppy? What artwork can you create to share this message?

What information can you find about National Recycling Week? What plans can you make for your family, class, or school?

What are your favourite animals to view at the zoo? Why?

December:

What would be on your menu for Christmas Day? What will your budget need to be?

What is the average temperature for this month? Make comparisons to another country.

What present do you hope to receive at Christmas? Why?

 

Take care everyone!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

P.S. I am so fortunate to be heading back to Dimboola PS for another day of professional learning on Friday, 30th July 2021! Check out the details below, you may wish to come along!

 

What does a great mathematics lesson look and sound like?

 

Everyone will receive a teaching resource of the warmup games, hooks, rich tasks, engaging games, strategies to differentiate, reflection tools, websites and more!

Andrea will share these teaching ideas using objects, photographs, modelling, doing, and reflecting.

This day is highly interactive! Be prepared to get involved.

Together we will explore the following questions:

  • What is the structure?

  • How do I build in ‘mathematical talk’?

  • What are quality tasks?

  • How do I support my mathematicians to reflect?

You will need to bring along a small gift box with a lid as we are creating a number box!

Suitable for primary school teachers of mathematicians in Levels F-6

Email Greg for details and to enrol Greg.Sampson@education.vic.gov.au

Take Away Teaching Ideas #30

Pig the Pug

Aaron Blabey

 

Who can resist Pig the Pug and Trevor? Not me!

A big shout out to Stacey at Manor Lakes as I recently enjoyed sharing this book with her students.

 

Here are twenty ideas to take away!

  1. Introduce the book using picture of Pig the Pug to create a jigsaw for the students to solve.

  2. Shared reading of the text inviting the students to read the rhyming words.

  3. Create and perform a Trevor and Pig the Pug puppet show.

  4. Vote and then justify your preference of character – Pig or Trevor.

I use cups and sticks to vote.

  1. View below.


     



  2. Explore phrases: Flipped his wig. Pigs can’t fly. I won’t and I swear!

  3. Investigate the meaning of words: Selfish, scoot, swine, loot.

  4. Create a garland of words from the text. Display in alphabetical order.

  5. Create a Can/Has/Like Chart.



  6. Create an ‘I Spy’ jar using pictures from the text.

  7. Make Trevor or Pig using play dough and care for him. Keep a journal.

  8. View Youtube clip and then draw own Pig the Pug.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hB-nunxTLT8

  9. Make a stocking Trevor the sausage dog. What other materials can you use?

  10. Write another Pig adventure. Follow up with reading Pig the Fibber.

  11. Write rules for Pig the Pug to follow. Make an instruction video.

  12. Add another animal to the story and write a different adventure.

  13. Write the story from Trevor’s point of view.

  14. Caption this! What is Trevor and Pig the Pug thinking and saying?

  15. Research the two dog breeds and compare. Use the precise vocabulary in a review.

  16. Investigate other dog stories!

 

My favourite is an Alison Lester book…

Added extra! Check out the teaching idea at:

 

https://andreahillbrick.com.au/the-wonder-of-words/

 

Enjoy!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Book Club:

Have you joined yet?

Check out the details at:

https://andreahillbrick.com.au/shop-online-resources/book-club-2/ 

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

 

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #29

BUTLEIGH FARM

Written by Di Hickleton

Illustrated by Melanie Macilwain

 

View Di’s website – www.butleighfarm.com.au

 

I have had the pleasure of knowing Di for many years!

It is so exciting to have Di collect and generate engaging ideas from her beautiful picture story book and for me to share them with you!

 

Thank you, Di, for preparing the Take Away Teaching Ideas #29

 

 

READING:

BOOK INTRODUCTION AND DISCUSSION ABOUT PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

So many questions could be asked …..…….

“What do you think the book is about?”

“Why would these animals be chosen for the front cover?”

“What other animals might you see on a farm?”

“Where do you think this farm might be?”

“Unusual name for a farm. Do you think the illustration on the back cover has anything to do with it’s name?”

“How do you think the animals might work together?”

“What things could animals possibly help with on a farm?”

“Why do you think there is a shovel on the dedication page?”

“What secrets could the animals have?”

“Is Murgheboluc a real place?”

Watch the Book Trailer:

 

 

 

READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

So many questions and connections can be made throughout and at the end.

“What wonderings do you have after reading?”

Put questions, connections, and wonderings on sticky notes during and after reading.

Display and discuss.

 

“Is Butleigh Farm a real place?”

“Do you think the animals are real or made up?”

“Why would Di have put can you guess who else lives on Butleigh Farm? on the last page?”

“What might be this character’s name?”

 

AFTER READING ACTIVITY IDEAS

Text to Self – share a story about yourself that is related to a story or character in the book.

 

Record yourself reading Butleigh Farm. Remember to read fluently, with expression and at a good pace.

WRITING:

FOCUS ON THE 6+1 TRAITS OF WRITING

Critique the book using the trait checklists below.

Use them for your own writing following through each of the traits.

READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

“Does Butleigh Farm have a Bold Beginning?”

“Does it hook you in to read more?”

Compare it with other books.    Make an anchor chart.

Write a different beginning to Butleigh Farm.

 

Repeat for Mighty Middles and Excellent Endings

 

“Do the animals have personalities?”

“Which is your favourite?”   “Why?”

“Could you think of other words to describe the animals?”

Look at your own writing.

“Do you get a feeling that the reader will really know your characters?”

 

Look at the Meet the Characters page under Books on the website.

www.butleighfarm.com.au

 

AFTER READING ACTIVITY IDEAS

Make your own book trailer for a book you have written or a book you really enjoy reading.

“What are the important things to include?”

 

Make a class set of Character Cards.

“What are everyone’s likes, favourite food, favourite song, etc.

 

Research a farm animal.

Present a poster, PowerPoint presentation, etc about what you found out.

Include interesting facts, features, habitat, care needed, food, importance on a farm, etc.

 

Write a letter to Di or Mel telling them some of your questions or wonderings.

 

Bubbles and clouds – Using speech bubbles/ thinking clouds and pictures of the Butleigh Farm characters, draw a conversation between two of the characters.

 

MATHEMATICS:

SUBITISE

“Look fast with your eyes and subitise”.

– apples on page

– windmill blades

 

PROBLEM SOLVING

e.g.     If there are 3 different types of farm animals in the top paddock with a total of 24 legs, what animals could they be and how many of each?

 

MAPPING

  • birds eye view
  • directions

Design a map of what your farm would look like and include if you had one.

 

Look at the Explore the Farm page under Books on the website.

www.butleighfarm.com.au

MEASUREMENT

  • perimeter
  • area
  • time – o’clock / half past
  • timelines

e.g.  – 6 o’clock – Bonnie barks at chook house

– 7 o’clock – Nanny comes outside

– 7:30am – Pa’s coffee is ready

“When do other daily events happen?”

“What times / routines do you have at home?”

“Would the animals have same bedtimes as you?”

 

SHAPE

2D – plan a farm (see above)

3D – build a farm (Lego, blocks, cardboard, nets)

 

COUNTING

by 1s, 2s, etc

forwards and backwards

  • apples (end pages)
  • windmill blades
  • flying birds
  • chickens
  • eggs
  • sheep in paddocks –

feet, tails, eyes, etc

  • fence posts
  • stairs
  • verandah posts
  • garden beds
  • flowers
  • spots on Nanny’s gumboots
  • stripes on Nanny’s top
  • fence palings on front gate
  • apples (complete book)
  • sheep (complete book)
  • shovels

 

STEM:

FARM MACHINARY

“What machinery / tools would you find on a farm?”

  • how do they work?
  • what do they do?

 

MATERIALS

– building animal enclosures – strength / waterproof / etc.

 

HABITATS

“What other animals could live at Butleigh Farm?”

“What would they need to be happy and comfortable?”

Design your own farm.

“What animals would you have?”

“What food would you have to buy / grow?”

– Sustainability!

 

ART:

“Do you think Mel has captured the animal’s characteristics in her illustrations?”

“Would you change how they look?”

Do some sketches of the animals.

Explore different mediums to create unique characters for your illustrations.

“Could this book be illustrated using only 4 colours like in Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion?”

Explore using different colours.

“Does it change the feel of the book?”

 

TEACHING FOCUS:

Butleigh Farm can be used for many specific teaching focuses. Check out the extensive list of examples below.

Finally …………

 

DID YOU FIND THE SHOVEL ON EVERY DOUBLE PAGE?

 

Enjoy and take care.

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching Ideas #27

Back to School Tortoise

Lucy M George

 

Happy New Year Everyone!

Every time I share this story the audience LOVES the ending! An awesome book to share on the first day of school with colleagues and students.

 

The story is about a tortoise who is afraid of going back to school. The tortoise is being brave and resilient, with a surprise at the end!

 

View the story below:

 

 

Real Thing:

Investigate, observe, draw, feel and create a tortoise.

Check out the ideas at this blog!

http://mrsmyerskindergarten.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/inquiring-about-tortoises.html

 

Sensory Tray:

Collect objects and present them on a tray so the students can use the five senses to gain an understanding of the story.

 

Picture match with the objects in the text such as the objects on the breakfast table.

Explore the mathematics about breakfast:

  • What time of the day is it?
  • What do you do before and after?
  • How many things do you eat?
  • What is your favourite breakfast food?
  • How much does your breakfast cost?

 

Make an alphabet book related to the story or your first day/week at school. Did you include mathematical terms?

 

Words around us:

Match the words from the text to environmental print in the classroom.

Add words from the story to the classroom word wall. Use the words in your writing.

 

Count words:

Rewrite a sentence/s from the story for the students to count the words. The students put a counter on each word.

 

We are going on a T hunt:

Tortoise begins with ‘t’! Provide each student with a letter ‘t’ attached to an icy pole stick. Search for the letter in the classroom, in books or in students’ names.

 

What’s in the box?

Inside the box is a tortoise mask. What animal do you think is in the box? The animal is the main character in our story. Read the factual clues to help you make a prediction.

If you would like these clues for this learning experience send me a request via email: andrea@andreahillbrick.com.au

 

Do the book:

Act out being the tortoise wearing your school bag.

Using a clothes basket move like a tortoise.

 

Create a sound scape for the story. This involves the students using musical instruments or everyday items to create sound effects for pages in the book.

 

Picture Retell:

Retell the story by sequencing the images.

Puppets:

Excite your students about the text using a tortoise puppet. The students can retell the text aloud using the puppet.

 

Text to self-connections:

When have you been brave? How did you feel? What helped you?

 

Text to self connections:

How do you feel about returning to school? What advice would you give Mr Tortoise?

 

Text to text connections:

Was the tortoise brave in this story? What was the same in the two stories? What is different? Do you know another story that had a brave character?

View the text below:

 

Innovate the text:

 

What would be a different ending to this story?

What other animals could be in the story? How would it change the story?

Can you rewrite the story as you as the main character?

What could be a different setting, problem, and resolution for Mr Tortoise?

 

Launch your 100 days of School count! Begin with a display of ten empty tens frames. Add an adhesive dot each day!

Create a survey to find out everyone’s favourite lunch at school. Graph the results.

Research the differences between a tortoise and turtle. How will you share this information?

 

Have a great start to your school year!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

NEW FOR 2021:

 

Book Club:

Have you joined yet? First teaching resource will arrive to you on the 17th January!

Check out the details by clicking on the link below.

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

 

Upcoming Webinar:  Writer’s Notebook

During the webinar Andrea will:

  • Explore key ideas related to generating and collecting ideas in a Writer’s Notebook.
  • Investigate four detailed lessons plans with images of examples
  • Provide strategies to differentiate
  • Share HHH – Hillbrick Handy Hints!

Each participant will receive a teaching resource with four detailed lesson plans and strategies to differentiate. The lessons are designed to be implemented the ‘very next day!’

Take Away Teaching Ideas #26

Harry The Dirty Dog

By Gene Zion

Pictures by Margaret Bloy Graham

It’s a family affair!

My family are the world to me! They are also a pivotal part of my business. Chelsea and Emma drive the online and design elements of my business. They are both so talented and generous. I am so blessed.

It is a thrill that my granddaughter Emma has collaborated with me to create this edition for you. Emma has just completed her third year of teaching training. As you can imagine I am so proud!

 

Harry is a white dog with black spots who hates to take a bath. One day he gets so dirty he has black fur with white spots Where’s Harry?

 

This engaging story was first published in 1956. It is an all time favourite of mine!

 

Enjoy a video of the story.

 

Watch Betty White reads the story.

 

Wonder:

I wonder why Margaret the illustrator only used four colours in the pictures.

Harry has a double letter in his name. I wonder how many words you can find with double letters.

Harry was a little dog with black spots who liked everything excepthaving a bath.  Everything is a compound word. I wonder what compound words you can find in books.

I wonder what you like to do and not like to do! Make a T chart to share your preferences.

I wonder how Harry and his family may have been feeling throughout the story.

Harry can do tricks. I wonder what tricks you can do. Make a short video to share your tricks.

I wonder if you have a story to share one time that you got very dirty!

I wonder what message you gained from the story.

 

Create:

Speech captions for Harry throughout the story.

Sound effects for the different settings in the story – train station, tip truck…

Your own story about Harry. What adventure does he get up to?

A story to show the problem and solution of this story.

A math game! Draw an outline of Harry. Collect a dice and counters. Roll the dice three times. After each roll to add the counters onto Harry. The counters are Harry’s spots. How many spots altogether?

A bird’s eye view map of Harry’s adventure. Where did he go?

An alternate route for Harry to escape from being washed.

A timeline to capture Harry’s adventure.

A procedure on how to wash a dog.

 

Investigate:

Using white paint on black cardboard and black on white cardboard to create a picture of Harry.

Washing muddy animals. Mix up some mud, dip in some plastic animals and wash in some soapy water. How did it feel? What did it smell like? What happened?

By researching an animal that you would like to have as a pet.

Other animals that have spots. What facts did you find about these animals?

By surveying your friends and family about their favourite animal with spots.

The two other books about Harry. What is the same and different?

                                               

 

This book was first published in 1956. Where do you find the publication year in a book? Investigate books in your classroom. What did you find?

Other books that the pictures are created by Margaret Bloy Graham. What did you find?

Harry plays tag with the other dogs. Investigate the number of dogs on the page.

  • How many ears altogether?
  • How many legs altogether?

What else could you count and share?

Mixing detergent and water to make bubbles.

 

Would you love a teaching resource for an awesome book emailed to you once a month?

 

Sign up for 2021 Book Club

https://andreahillbrick.com.au/shop-online-resources/book-club-2/

 

 

 

Sending my best wishes to you and your families.

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #25

Giraffe Problems

By Jory John

RECONNECT is a word that I have used a lot this year! By implementing my webinars, I have been able to reconnect and collaborate with so many colleagues. It has been an opportunity to share my current thinking and insights with educators in Australia and beyond!

The author of this edition is one person I was so excited to reconnect with. Deb David is a passionate educator who loves all things about learning. She works as a part of an amazing team at St Albans’ Primary School. Meeting up with Deb again has been a bonus!

Thanks, Deb, for introducing me to another new book and creating these ideas for us all.



Edward the giraffe can’t understand why his neck is as long and bendy and, well, ridiculous as it is. No other animal has a neck this absurd. He’s tried disguising it, dressing it up, strategically hiding it behind bushes–honestly, anything you can think of, he’s tried. Just when Edward has exhausted his neck-hiding options and is about to throw in the towel, a turtle swoops in (well, ambles in, very slowly) and helps him understand that his neck has a purpose, and looks excellent in a bow tie.

 

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/563426/giraffe-problems-by-jory-john-illustrated-by-lane-smith/

 

 

You can view the story below:

 

Watch Michele Obama reads it aloud:

 

 

Our readers can:

 

Predict: Before reading make a prediction of what this book could be about. What could a giraffe problem be? Justify your prediction using your prior knowledge and clues from the book. After reading, revisit your predictions.

Compare and contrast: Use a Venn diagram to show the similarities and differences between Edward and Cyrus. You can easily make a Venn diagram by overlapping two paper plates.

Make Connections: Make a connection to yourself from the book. When has a friend helped to cheer you up or when did you cheer a friend up? How did it make you feel?

Investigate words: glorious, accomplished, delectable… create a word splash of interesting words used in the book. Write the words on cards and sort them. Set the challenge to try and use one new word every day when talking to their classmates. Add the words to your classroom interactive word wall.

Explore the author’s purpose: An author always writes with a purpose. What do you think Jory John’s purpose is? Is there a lesson we can learn from Edward and Cyrus?

Infer: We are never told where this story is taking place. Where do you think it is? Justify for answers using clues from the text.

Search for synonyms: gander, stare, glimpse and gaze are words Jory John uses instead of the word “look.” What other words could we use instead of look? What is the difference between glimpse and gaze, or gaze and stare? Why would the author choose those words over look? Write the words on cards and order them from glimpse to stare discussing the subtle differences/shades of meaning between the words.

Make a text to text connection: Read Jory John’s Penguin Problems. How are the two books the same? How are they different?

 

 

Research: What do you know about the animals in this book? What would you like to know? Let’s use websites and books to discover some facts!

Engage writers by:

Text innovation: Draw your own giraffe neck (use page two as inspiration). How would you describe your neck? It’s too wiggly, too bendy, too curly, too straight, too zany.

Factual writing: Write a description about the appearance of a giraffe. What interesting words would you use to describe its neck, its patterns, the way it moves?

Text Innovation: Edward’s problem is his neck is too long, Cyrus’ neck is too short. What type of problems would other animals have? Think, pair, share to generate ideas and students create their own narrative.

Personal Writing: Edward’s mother said he should be proud of his neck. What does it mean to be proud? What are you proud of?

Persuasive Writing: Would you rather have a long neck or a short neck? If you had a long neck for the day what would you do? How would you persuade others to have a long or short neck?

Exploring word choice: Cyrus describes a banana as ‘delectable.’ Using the 5 senses, what other words can we use to describe a banana. Don’t forget to use the book to see other words Cyrus uses.

Small moments: Revisit Cyrus telling Edwards about his week long, banana dilemma. Have you experienced a time you had to wait or a time when they had to persist with a problem?

Procedural writing: At the end of the story Cyrus and Edward wear a bow tie. Write instructions to their friend the zebra on how to tie a bow tie.

 

This book is a great springboard to launch into mathematics investigations:

Measurement: How long is Edward’s neck? What can we use to measure it? Provide students a picture of Edwards neck and record how long it is using a range of informal/formal units. Don’t forget to estimate before you measure! Extra challenge: compare it to your neck. What is the difference in length?

Using a tie, identify, measure and record the length of objects. What did you find out? How will you share your thinking?

Patterns: Edwards tries to dress up his long neck. Design a patterned scarf, tie or bow tie for Edward’s long neck. As a class, create a tally of the different patterns used – stripes, shapes, colours. Don’t forget to make a bow tie for Cyrus too!

Cyrus the turtle has an attractive shell. What shapes can you see? What patterns can you make using the shapes? How will you share the patterns and your thinking?

Positional language: Edwards wants to hide his neck. Where could he hide? Behind a tree, in a ditch… The mathematicians create their own Edward and hide it in different parts of the classroom. Photograph to make a class book. The mathematicians write about Edward’s location.

Classifying: List all the animals that appear in the book. How could we classify them? How can you represent this data? As a tally, graph, table?

Problem Solving: There are 12 animals featured in the book. How many legs might there be all together? Show your thinking in pictures, numbers, and words.

Time: Edward wants to ‘hide until the sun sets.’ When does the sun set? How long does Edward want to hide for? What other phrases can we use to describe the length of time?

Ordering: Research the heights of different animals. Order them from shortest to tallest. Discuss all the vocabulary we can use to describe height. This could be a good opportunity to discuss why we say the giraffe has a long neck instead of a tall neck.

Number: Edward has a bundle of scarves. Collect a bundle of materials. How many is in your bundle? How will you share your total and your thinking?

 

Enjoy and stay connected,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching Ideas #24

Dharma the Llama

By Matt Cosgrove

 

A delightful BLAST FROM THE PAST!

I feel very honoured to introduce Janette Colbert to you all. Many moons ago, Janette and I worked closely together at Beaconsfield Primary School in Victoria. She continues to be a passionate teacher! The beauty of our profession is the many friendships you develop over time. I am happy to present the teaching ideas created by Janette and I – ENJOY!

 

I adore the way Matt writes and illustrates. His books have been great seeds for my Writer’s Notebook and to develop comprehension strategies. This book is my favourite! I adore the character Dharma – but I also LOVE reading books and flowers. (Maybe a text to self connection)

Listen and view Matt introduce Dharma:

 

Listen to and view Jessica Mauboy present this fabulous story as a rap:

I think this is a great initiative and once you hear this rap….you love the story even more!

  • Looking at the front cover what shapes can you see? What could you draw using these shapes?

 

  • Study the end papers inside the front and back cover. What clues do they give us about the story? Can you create end papers for your own story?

 

  • On the title page, how many butterflies do you see? Activate your prior knowledge. What do you know about butterflies? Why do you think Matt include them in this illustration?

 

  • Explore the rhyming words in the text by selecting four words and make a Think Board of rhyming words. Put one word in each section of the Think Board and brainstorm as many rhyming words as possible to fill each section.

 

  • Go on a print walk and select words you love! Can you show the meaning of the words using colour, size, and shape?

 

    • Dharma loves to read both fiction and nonfiction books. After reading Dharma the Llama, read a nonfiction book about llamas. Compare and contrast – how are the two books similar? How are they different?

 

    • What are your favourite fiction and nonfiction books? How would you promote these books?

 

    • Go on a punctuation mark hunt! What did you find? How are you going to show your findings?

 

    • Dharma’s books all have titles with a twist on real life stories. Think of your favourite book and give it a llama twist for its title. Create a new front cover for your book with its new title and yourself as the author. Create a new back cover, including a blurb for your book.

 

    • Dharma declares ‘X marks the spot!’ Create a pirate map using a birds-eye-view. Use your best pirate voice to explain your map!

 

    • Follow instructions to make a pirate hat like Dharmas. Make a short video for someone else to follow.

 

    • Use the colours of the llamas in the story to create your own pattern – how many elements can you include?

 

    • Dharma made her own rope ladder. Make your own creation out of rope. Write the instructions as a procedural text that someone else could follow. Create a class book for everyone to try!

 

    • Make Ooblek and put objects in it to recreate the llamas stuck in the mud. Explore the properties of Ooblek – what makes it tricky for objects to get out? How is this similar to mud?

 

    • Create a new adventurous way for Dharma to save the other llamas – she tried a rope ladder, a vine swing and hot air balloons as an astronaut. Illustrate and write your solution.

 

    • Make a list of all of the bold words in the book. Categorise them as verbs and adjectives.

 

    • Create a list of everything that you would need to throw a party. Use a shopping catalogue or online shopping to find out the total cost of your party.

 

  • Create a map that shows all of the adventures of the llamas. Use a map key to show important features on your map.

 

  • Collect data in response to the question- What animals appear in the book? how will you present your data?

 

  • Make a list of all of the titles of the books Dharma reads. Survey your family and friends or classmates to find out which book they would most like to read. Present your survey findings as a graph of your choice.

 

  • Use the activities of the llamas to create a daily timetable – include the times they started and finished each activity.

 

  • Dharma wears a chin of flowers around her neck. Have you ever made a daisy chain? Try it out! How long is it? How many flowers did you use?

 

  • Dharma loves to read anything, any time and anywhere! What do you like to read? What is your favourite spot? Create a profile about yourself and share.

 

Happy World Teacher’s Day everyone!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

 

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #23

Why I love Footy

By Michael Wagner

You can view Michael reading the story at HERE 

 

To take advantage of all a book has to offer I implement a Teacher Book Walk!

 

What is a Teacher Book Walk? (TBW)

We implement a ‘walk’ through the book together -with a colleague or in a team.

Implementing a TBW helps us consider all the learning opportunities presented in the text:

  • Teaching writers
  • Teaching readers
  • Teaching mathematicians
  • Teaching investigators

During a TBW, we consider all components of the fiction or non-fiction book:

  • front and back covers
  • content/words
  • illustrations
  • diagrams
  • headings
  • table of contents
  • labels
  • speech captions
  • thought bubbles
  • font style and size
  • end pages

We use what we have discovered from the TBW to make connections with the needs and interests of our learners.

How do we implement a TBW?

  1. Select a small selection of books.
  2. Read a brief overview of each book. This book is about…a synopsis for books can be located online.
  3. Select one book to implement a TBW.
  4. View or implement a read aloud of the book – become very familiar with the book.
  5. Walk through the book and consider each feature or page.
  6. Identify a learning opportunity and share.
  7. Make links to your learners, to teaching strategies and to the curriculum.

It is amazing what you discover when you collaborate to identify quality teaching strategies through exploring quality texts!

 

Check out my TBW for Michael’s engaging story I Love Footy!

 

If you get a chance to implement one of these ideas tag me in on your post!

I would love to see these ideas come alive! 

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching Ideas #18

The Heart and the Bottle

By Oliver Jeffers

 

Once there was a girl whose life was filled with all the wonder of the world around her.

Then one day something occurred that caused the girl to take her heart and put it in a safe place.

However, after that it seemed that more things were empty than before. Would she know when and how to get her heart back?

 

You can view the story here

 

Watch Oliver read the story: https://youtu.be/CeLZDwHKLjo

 

In Term 2, I had the privilege of collaborating with each PLC at Fyans Park PS in Geelong. We created a whole school author/illustrator study. Each PLC selected texts written or illustrated by Oliver Jeffers to explore and investigate with their students.

 

A big thanks to the 5/6 PLC – Abbie Walker, Alex Pink, Ali Hayes, Kirsten Young & Lauren McGill, for sharing these teaching ideas for this superb story.

  • Follow the steps to fold an origami heart. Place your heart in your own jar.
  • Vocabulary investigation – curiosity: Collect items such as a telescope, astronomy, sea animals, instruments that ignite curiosity.
  • Writer’s Notebook: The writers select one of the objects and brainstorm their questions and statements.
  • Investigate the frequency of nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs.
  • Punctuation investigation: Why did Oliver include ellipses and commas? How do we respond to these as we read?
  • Explore the meaning – ‘The heart that was put back where it came from’
  • Sentence length investigation: What type of sentences did Oliver use? Why did he vary the sentence length?
  • Illustrations investigation: What colours did Oliver select to depict the character’s feelings?
  • Feelings change: Track the character’s feelings throughout the text. Match the characters feelings to the events.
  • Investigate: Why are some think bubbles are filled with illustrations rather than text?
  • Front load: Implement a Think aloud to address the question – Does the character really put her heart in a bottle?
  • What message did you gain from this story? Discuss with peers. Did you all have the same message? What are you now thinking?
  • What happens next? Write a continuation of the story.
  • Investigate the heart – physical and emotional.
  • Create a jar of gratitude. Write the things that you grateful for and store in a jar to revisit and share.
  • Investigate and record observations about the night sky. What are you curious about? What question will you research?
  • Video yourself reading an Oliver Jeffers story. Who are you going to share the reading with? What feedback did you receive?
  • Create a bookmark that would support the reader to understand the story.
  • Create a short video to promote the story.
  • Compare and contrast the story with another publication by Oliver Jeffers.

Can you guess the book the Specialist PLC explored with all the students?

Thanks to Jodie Thomson for the photograph!

 

 

Love books by Oliver Jeffers? This teaching resource for the story ‘Stuck’ by Oliver Jeffers is designed for teachers who love to explore books across the curriculum in meaningful and engaging ways!

The resource includes:

  • Hooks to engage
  • Fun tasks to investigate letters and words
  • Opportunities to build comprehension strategies
  • Strategies to motivate writers
  • Learning experiences with strong connections to mathematics
  • Springboards for investigations

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #17

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!

By Mo Willems

 

You can view the story here

 

Jenny Kompa and I share a passion for books! Jenny and I are often chatting about our latest reading lists. I was so excited when Jenny agreed to collaborate and with her choice of book!

Thanks Jenny 😊

 

Jenny and I hope you enjoy your students love for these teaching ideas!

 

Great read aloud for younger students. They love to get involved! They get very loud & animated! The text is highly effective as an introduction to persuasive texts.

 

Find out more about Mo Willems HERE

 

Mo has made a number of videos recently called ‘Lunch Doodles’. They’re quite random in content & length but in the first one he shares his writer’s notebooks, mock-ups and drafts of some of his books and gives a pigeon drawing tutorial.

 

Check out these teaching ideas:

 

Text innovation:

Text innovation takes a text and allows the students to change characters, setting, and story elements to make a personalised version of the story.

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Truck! (end of story)

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the…(other transport)

Don’t Let the Pigeon… (so many possibilities and always a class favourite!)

What if you DID let the pigeon drive the bus? (Oh no!)

Explore speech bubbles & thought bubbles – difference & purpose.

Explore punctuation – question marks & exclamation marks. How does our voice change when we read these aloud?

What strategies does the pigeon use to attempt to persuade you to let him drive the bus?

Line debates – for and against letting the pigeon drive the bus.

Read more about line debates. Find out more about line debates at:

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/52db91b3e4b0c2e3ce0f1ce4/t/56bc4b379f72665ed6d3749e/1455180628040/Gladly-teach.pdf

Lean on the pictures. What is the pigeon doing? What happened first? What do you think is going to happen next?

Explore the pigeon’s emotions. Map out how the pigeon’s feelings change in the story. What events influence the change?

Discuss and list the character traits of the pigeon. Play charades for the other players to guess the traits.

Ignite class discussion around whether the pigeon could actually drive the bus. This may lead to an exploration of pigeons with jobs and learning all about the role of pigeons during war time.

Create some puppets and use them to retell this story.

Create your own pictures of this pigeon doing unusual tasks and add captions.

Create the word VROOM using materials that represent the sound.

Research facts about pigeons. I can recommend this website:

https://onekindplanet.org/animal/pigeon/

Mo used interesting fonts. Have you trialled using different fonts when you publish your writing? Write an awesome sentence about the book using different fonts.

What shapes did Mo use to create the illustration of the pigeon?

Follow the drawing tutorial of the pigeon HERE

Create a 3D model of a bus. What’s the mathematics about your bus? How many wheels? What colours did you use? What shapes have you used to create the bus?

Trace around the perimeter of your hand to use as the body to begin to create a pigeon.

Make a tally to calculate the most used word in the story.

Design and implement a survey to find out who would let the pigeon drive the bus.

If the Pigeon gave you five bucks (dollars) what coins could he give you? How many options are there?

 

Links to other texts:

Mo Willems Pigeon series

Mo Willems ‘Elephant & Piggie’ series (also cartoon style illustrations and speech & thought bubbles)

Oscar’s Book -Golden Book (one of Jenny’s childhood faves!)

Do Not Open This Book – Andy Lee (series)

Gary by Leila Rudge

Wheels on the Bus song

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick