Posts

Take Away Teaching Ideas #29

BUTLEIGH FARM

Written by Di Hickleton

Illustrated by Melanie Macilwain

 

View Di’s website – www.butleighfarm.com.au

 

I have had the pleasure of knowing Di for many years!

It is so exciting to have Di collect and generate engaging ideas from her beautiful picture story book and for me to share them with you!

 

Thank you, Di, for preparing the Take Away Teaching Ideas #29

 

 

READING:

BOOK INTRODUCTION AND DISCUSSION ABOUT PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

So many questions could be asked …..…….

“What do you think the book is about?”

“Why would these animals be chosen for the front cover?”

“What other animals might you see on a farm?”

“Where do you think this farm might be?”

“Unusual name for a farm. Do you think the illustration on the back cover has anything to do with it’s name?”

“How do you think the animals might work together?”

“What things could animals possibly help with on a farm?”

“Why do you think there is a shovel on the dedication page?”

“What secrets could the animals have?”

“Is Murgheboluc a real place?”

Watch the Book Trailer:

 

 

 

READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

So many questions and connections can be made throughout and at the end.

“What wonderings do you have after reading?”

Put questions, connections, and wonderings on sticky notes during and after reading.

Display and discuss.

 

“Is Butleigh Farm a real place?”

“Do you think the animals are real or made up?”

“Why would Di have put can you guess who else lives on Butleigh Farm? on the last page?”

“What might be this character’s name?”

 

AFTER READING ACTIVITY IDEAS

Text to Self – share a story about yourself that is related to a story or character in the book.

 

Record yourself reading Butleigh Farm. Remember to read fluently, with expression and at a good pace.

WRITING:

FOCUS ON THE 6+1 TRAITS OF WRITING

Critique the book using the trait checklists below.

Use them for your own writing following through each of the traits.

READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

“Does Butleigh Farm have a Bold Beginning?”

“Does it hook you in to read more?”

Compare it with other books.    Make an anchor chart.

Write a different beginning to Butleigh Farm.

 

Repeat for Mighty Middles and Excellent Endings

 

“Do the animals have personalities?”

“Which is your favourite?”   “Why?”

“Could you think of other words to describe the animals?”

Look at your own writing.

“Do you get a feeling that the reader will really know your characters?”

 

Look at the Meet the Characters page under Books on the website.

www.butleighfarm.com.au

 

AFTER READING ACTIVITY IDEAS

Make your own book trailer for a book you have written or a book you really enjoy reading.

“What are the important things to include?”

 

Make a class set of Character Cards.

“What are everyone’s likes, favourite food, favourite song, etc.

 

Research a farm animal.

Present a poster, PowerPoint presentation, etc about what you found out.

Include interesting facts, features, habitat, care needed, food, importance on a farm, etc.

 

Write a letter to Di or Mel telling them some of your questions or wonderings.

 

Bubbles and clouds – Using speech bubbles/ thinking clouds and pictures of the Butleigh Farm characters, draw a conversation between two of the characters.

 

MATHEMATICS:

SUBITISE

“Look fast with your eyes and subitise”.

– apples on page

– windmill blades

 

PROBLEM SOLVING

e.g.     If there are 3 different types of farm animals in the top paddock with a total of 24 legs, what animals could they be and how many of each?

 

MAPPING

  • birds eye view
  • directions

Design a map of what your farm would look like and include if you had one.

 

Look at the Explore the Farm page under Books on the website.

www.butleighfarm.com.au

MEASUREMENT

  • perimeter
  • area
  • time – o’clock / half past
  • timelines

e.g.  – 6 o’clock – Bonnie barks at chook house

– 7 o’clock – Nanny comes outside

– 7:30am – Pa’s coffee is ready

“When do other daily events happen?”

“What times / routines do you have at home?”

“Would the animals have same bedtimes as you?”

 

SHAPE

2D – plan a farm (see above)

3D – build a farm (Lego, blocks, cardboard, nets)

 

COUNTING

by 1s, 2s, etc

forwards and backwards

  • apples (end pages)
  • windmill blades
  • flying birds
  • chickens
  • eggs
  • sheep in paddocks –

feet, tails, eyes, etc

  • fence posts
  • stairs
  • verandah posts
  • garden beds
  • flowers
  • spots on Nanny’s gumboots
  • stripes on Nanny’s top
  • fence palings on front gate
  • apples (complete book)
  • sheep (complete book)
  • shovels

 

STEM:

FARM MACHINARY

“What machinery / tools would you find on a farm?”

  • how do they work?
  • what do they do?

 

MATERIALS

– building animal enclosures – strength / waterproof / etc.

 

HABITATS

“What other animals could live at Butleigh Farm?”

“What would they need to be happy and comfortable?”

Design your own farm.

“What animals would you have?”

“What food would you have to buy / grow?”

– Sustainability!

 

ART:

“Do you think Mel has captured the animal’s characteristics in her illustrations?”

“Would you change how they look?”

Do some sketches of the animals.

Explore different mediums to create unique characters for your illustrations.

“Could this book be illustrated using only 4 colours like in Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion?”

Explore using different colours.

“Does it change the feel of the book?”

 

TEACHING FOCUS:

Butleigh Farm can be used for many specific teaching focuses. Check out the extensive list of examples below.

Finally …………

 

DID YOU FIND THE SHOVEL ON EVERY DOUBLE PAGE?

 

Enjoy and take care.

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching ideas #28

Here We Are

Oliver Jeffers

One of my all-time favourite books and authors!

 

View the story here:

 

In this edition I have explored the book as a mentor text for writers. I have listed the trait, goal with page number and evidence within the text.

 

Ideas:

  • The topic is narrow, clear, and manageable.

 

Front Cover:            Here We Are Notes for living on planet Earth.

 

Page 3:                    It is a big globe,

                                   floating in space,

                                  on which we live.

 

  • The pictures enhance the key ideas.

 

Page 13:                 Labels on the body illustration

                                           Brain (for thinking)

                                           Heart ( to pump your blood)

 

Page 15/16:            Illustrations of the people

 

Organisation:

  • It has an introduction that is an “attention grabber”. The reader is interested in reading on.

 

Page 3:                 Well, hello.

 

Page 6:                 So let’s get started with a quick tour.

 

  • The conclusion leaves the reader with resolution.

 

Page 31:              Make sure you look after it,

                              As it all we’ve got.

 

Page 37:             You’re never alone on Earth.

 

Voice:

  • The reader feels “connected” to the writer.

 

Page 2:               *Probably not to scale

 

Page 3:                Well, hello.

 

Page 28:              Just remember to leave notes for everyone else.

 

Word Choice:

  • The words are specific and build understanding.

 

Page 13:             Labels on the illustration

 

Page 30:            7,327,450,667 and counting.

 

  • The selection of words should help the reader see, feel, hear, taste, or understand.

 

Page 8:               hot, pointy, cold, bumpy, flat, dry, wet

 

Sentence Fluency:

  • The writer chooses words that sound good, and the writing is easy to read.

 

Page 30:              It looks big, Earth.

                               But there are lots of us on here.

                               So be kind.

                              There is enough for everyone.

 

Conventions:

  • Punctuation is accurate and appropriate.

 

Ellipsis:

Page 11:                Though it can get pretty complicated

 

Page 32:             Now, if you need to know anything else

 

Presentation:

  • There is an alignment between the text and visuals.

 

Page 17:                They come in even more shapes, sizes, and colours.

 

Page 21 & 22:       Things can sometimes move slowly here on Earth.

 

Page 35:               …you can always ask someone else.

 

Have fun exploring this text with your writers!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

NEW FOR 2021:

Book Club:                                  Join Up Now!  

The second teaching resource was emailed on 17th of February 2021!

Check out the details at: https://andreahillbrick.com.au/shop-online-resources/book-club-2/

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

Take Away Teaching Ideas #27

Back to School Tortoise

Lucy M George

 

Happy New Year Everyone!

Every time I share this story the audience LOVES the ending! An awesome book to share on the first day of school with colleagues and students.

 

The story is about a tortoise who is afraid of going back to school. The tortoise is being brave and resilient, with a surprise at the end!

 

View the story below:

 

 

Real Thing:

Investigate, observe, draw, feel and create a tortoise.

Check out the ideas at this blog!

http://mrsmyerskindergarten.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/inquiring-about-tortoises.html

 

Sensory Tray:

Collect objects and present them on a tray so the students can use the five senses to gain an understanding of the story.

 

Picture match with the objects in the text such as the objects on the breakfast table.

Explore the mathematics about breakfast:

  • What time of the day is it?
  • What do you do before and after?
  • How many things do you eat?
  • What is your favourite breakfast food?
  • How much does your breakfast cost?

 

Make an alphabet book related to the story or your first day/week at school. Did you include mathematical terms?

 

Words around us:

Match the words from the text to environmental print in the classroom.

Add words from the story to the classroom word wall. Use the words in your writing.

 

Count words:

Rewrite a sentence/s from the story for the students to count the words. The students put a counter on each word.

 

We are going on a T hunt:

Tortoise begins with ‘t’! Provide each student with a letter ‘t’ attached to an icy pole stick. Search for the letter in the classroom, in books or in students’ names.

 

What’s in the box?

Inside the box is a tortoise mask. What animal do you think is in the box? The animal is the main character in our story. Read the factual clues to help you make a prediction.

If you would like these clues for this learning experience send me a request via email: andrea@andreahillbrick.com.au

 

Do the book:

Act out being the tortoise wearing your school bag.

Using a clothes basket move like a tortoise.

 

Create a sound scape for the story. This involves the students using musical instruments or everyday items to create sound effects for pages in the book.

 

Picture Retell:

Retell the story by sequencing the images.

Puppets:

Excite your students about the text using a tortoise puppet. The students can retell the text aloud using the puppet.

 

Text to self-connections:

When have you been brave? How did you feel? What helped you?

 

Text to self connections:

How do you feel about returning to school? What advice would you give Mr Tortoise?

 

Text to text connections:

Was the tortoise brave in this story? What was the same in the two stories? What is different? Do you know another story that had a brave character?

View the text below:

 

Innovate the text:

 

What would be a different ending to this story?

What other animals could be in the story? How would it change the story?

Can you rewrite the story as you as the main character?

What could be a different setting, problem, and resolution for Mr Tortoise?

 

Launch your 100 days of School count! Begin with a display of ten empty tens frames. Add an adhesive dot each day!

Create a survey to find out everyone’s favourite lunch at school. Graph the results.

Research the differences between a tortoise and turtle. How will you share this information?

 

Have a great start to your school year!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

NEW FOR 2021:

 

Book Club:

Have you joined yet? First teaching resource will arrive to you on the 17th January!

Check out the details by clicking on the link below.

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

 

Upcoming Webinar:  Writer’s Notebook

During the webinar Andrea will:

  • Explore key ideas related to generating and collecting ideas in a Writer’s Notebook.
  • Investigate four detailed lessons plans with images of examples
  • Provide strategies to differentiate
  • Share HHH – Hillbrick Handy Hints!

Each participant will receive a teaching resource with four detailed lesson plans and strategies to differentiate. The lessons are designed to be implemented the ‘very next day!’

Take Away Teaching Ideas #29

BUTLEIGH FARM

Written by Di Hickleton

Illustrated by Melanie Macilwain

 

View Di’s website – www.butleighfarm.com.au

 

I have had the pleasure of knowing Di for many years!

It is so exciting to have Di collect and generate engaging ideas from her beautiful picture story book and for me to share them with you!

 

Thank you, Di, for preparing the Take Away Teaching Ideas #29

 

 

READING:

BOOK INTRODUCTION AND DISCUSSION ABOUT PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

So many questions could be asked …..…….

“What do you think the book is about?”

“Why would these animals be chosen for the front cover?”

“What other animals might you see on a farm?”

“Where do you think this farm might be?”

“Unusual name for a farm. Do you think the illustration on the back cover has anything to do with it’s name?”

“How do you think the animals might work together?”

“What things could animals possibly help with on a farm?”

“Why do you think there is a shovel on the dedication page?”

“What secrets could the animals have?”

“Is Murgheboluc a real place?”

Watch the Book Trailer:

 

 

 

READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

So many questions and connections can be made throughout and at the end.

“What wonderings do you have after reading?”

Put questions, connections, and wonderings on sticky notes during and after reading.

Display and discuss.

 

“Is Butleigh Farm a real place?”

“Do you think the animals are real or made up?”

“Why would Di have put can you guess who else lives on Butleigh Farm? on the last page?”

“What might be this character’s name?”

 

AFTER READING ACTIVITY IDEAS

Text to Self – share a story about yourself that is related to a story or character in the book.

 

Record yourself reading Butleigh Farm. Remember to read fluently, with expression and at a good pace.

WRITING:

FOCUS ON THE 6+1 TRAITS OF WRITING

Critique the book using the trait checklists below.

Use them for your own writing following through each of the traits.

READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

“Does Butleigh Farm have a Bold Beginning?”

“Does it hook you in to read more?”

Compare it with other books.    Make an anchor chart.

Write a different beginning to Butleigh Farm.

 

Repeat for Mighty Middles and Excellent Endings

 

“Do the animals have personalities?”

“Which is your favourite?”   “Why?”

“Could you think of other words to describe the animals?”

Look at your own writing.

“Do you get a feeling that the reader will really know your characters?”

 

Look at the Meet the Characters page under Books on the website.

www.butleighfarm.com.au

 

AFTER READING ACTIVITY IDEAS

Make your own book trailer for a book you have written or a book you really enjoy reading.

“What are the important things to include?”

 

Make a class set of Character Cards.

“What are everyone’s likes, favourite food, favourite song, etc.

 

Research a farm animal.

Present a poster, PowerPoint presentation, etc about what you found out.

Include interesting facts, features, habitat, care needed, food, importance on a farm, etc.

 

Write a letter to Di or Mel telling them some of your questions or wonderings.

 

Bubbles and clouds – Using speech bubbles/ thinking clouds and pictures of the Butleigh Farm characters, draw a conversation between two of the characters.

 

MATHEMATICS:

SUBITISE

“Look fast with your eyes and subitise”.

– apples on page

– windmill blades

 

PROBLEM SOLVING

e.g.     If there are 3 different types of farm animals in the top paddock with a total of 24 legs, what animals could they be and how many of each?

 

MAPPING

  • birds eye view
  • directions

Design a map of what your farm would look like and include if you had one.

 

Look at the Explore the Farm page under Books on the website.

www.butleighfarm.com.au

MEASUREMENT

  • perimeter
  • area
  • time – o’clock / half past
  • timelines

e.g.  – 6 o’clock – Bonnie barks at chook house

– 7 o’clock – Nanny comes outside

– 7:30am – Pa’s coffee is ready

“When do other daily events happen?”

“What times / routines do you have at home?”

“Would the animals have same bedtimes as you?”

 

SHAPE

2D – plan a farm (see above)

3D – build a farm (Lego, blocks, cardboard, nets)

 

COUNTING

by 1s, 2s, etc

forwards and backwards

  • apples (end pages)
  • windmill blades
  • flying birds
  • chickens
  • eggs
  • sheep in paddocks –

feet, tails, eyes, etc

  • fence posts
  • stairs
  • verandah posts
  • garden beds
  • flowers
  • spots on Nanny’s gumboots
  • stripes on Nanny’s top
  • fence palings on front gate
  • apples (complete book)
  • sheep (complete book)
  • shovels

 

STEM:

FARM MACHINARY

“What machinery / tools would you find on a farm?”

  • how do they work?
  • what do they do?

 

MATERIALS

– building animal enclosures – strength / waterproof / etc.

 

HABITATS

“What other animals could live at Butleigh Farm?”

“What would they need to be happy and comfortable?”

Design your own farm.

“What animals would you have?”

“What food would you have to buy / grow?”

– Sustainability!

 

ART:

“Do you think Mel has captured the animal’s characteristics in her illustrations?”

“Would you change how they look?”

Do some sketches of the animals.

Explore different mediums to create unique characters for your illustrations.

“Could this book be illustrated using only 4 colours like in Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion?”

Explore using different colours.

“Does it change the feel of the book?”

 

TEACHING FOCUS:

Butleigh Farm can be used for many specific teaching focuses. Check out the extensive list of examples below.

Finally …………

 

DID YOU FIND THE SHOVEL ON EVERY DOUBLE PAGE?

 

Enjoy and take care.

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching ideas #28

Here We Are

Oliver Jeffers

One of my all-time favourite books and authors!

 

View the story here:

 

In this edition I have explored the book as a mentor text for writers. I have listed the trait, goal with page number and evidence within the text.

 

Ideas:

  • The topic is narrow, clear, and manageable.

 

Front Cover:            Here We Are Notes for living on planet Earth.

 

Page 3:                    It is a big globe,

                                   floating in space,

                                  on which we live.

 

  • The pictures enhance the key ideas.

 

Page 13:                 Labels on the body illustration

                                           Brain (for thinking)

                                           Heart ( to pump your blood)

 

Page 15/16:            Illustrations of the people

 

Organisation:

  • It has an introduction that is an “attention grabber”. The reader is interested in reading on.

 

Page 3:                 Well, hello.

 

Page 6:                 So let’s get started with a quick tour.

 

  • The conclusion leaves the reader with resolution.

 

Page 31:              Make sure you look after it,

                              As it all we’ve got.

 

Page 37:             You’re never alone on Earth.

 

Voice:

  • The reader feels “connected” to the writer.

 

Page 2:               *Probably not to scale

 

Page 3:                Well, hello.

 

Page 28:              Just remember to leave notes for everyone else.

 

Word Choice:

  • The words are specific and build understanding.

 

Page 13:             Labels on the illustration

 

Page 30:            7,327,450,667 and counting.

 

  • The selection of words should help the reader see, feel, hear, taste, or understand.

 

Page 8:               hot, pointy, cold, bumpy, flat, dry, wet

 

Sentence Fluency:

  • The writer chooses words that sound good, and the writing is easy to read.

 

Page 30:              It looks big, Earth.

                               But there are lots of us on here.

                               So be kind.

                              There is enough for everyone.

 

Conventions:

  • Punctuation is accurate and appropriate.

 

Ellipsis:

Page 11:                Though it can get pretty complicated

 

Page 32:             Now, if you need to know anything else

 

Presentation:

  • There is an alignment between the text and visuals.

 

Page 17:                They come in even more shapes, sizes, and colours.

 

Page 21 & 22:       Things can sometimes move slowly here on Earth.

 

Page 35:               …you can always ask someone else.

 

Have fun exploring this text with your writers!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

NEW FOR 2021:

Book Club:                                  Join Up Now!  

The second teaching resource was emailed on 17th of February 2021!

Check out the details at: https://andreahillbrick.com.au/shop-online-resources/book-club-2/

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

Take Away Teaching Ideas #27

Back to School Tortoise

Lucy M George

 

Happy New Year Everyone!

Every time I share this story the audience LOVES the ending! An awesome book to share on the first day of school with colleagues and students.

 

The story is about a tortoise who is afraid of going back to school. The tortoise is being brave and resilient, with a surprise at the end!

 

View the story below:

 

 

Real Thing:

Investigate, observe, draw, feel and create a tortoise.

Check out the ideas at this blog!

http://mrsmyerskindergarten.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/inquiring-about-tortoises.html

 

Sensory Tray:

Collect objects and present them on a tray so the students can use the five senses to gain an understanding of the story.

 

Picture match with the objects in the text such as the objects on the breakfast table.

Explore the mathematics about breakfast:

  • What time of the day is it?
  • What do you do before and after?
  • How many things do you eat?
  • What is your favourite breakfast food?
  • How much does your breakfast cost?

 

Make an alphabet book related to the story or your first day/week at school. Did you include mathematical terms?

 

Words around us:

Match the words from the text to environmental print in the classroom.

Add words from the story to the classroom word wall. Use the words in your writing.

 

Count words:

Rewrite a sentence/s from the story for the students to count the words. The students put a counter on each word.

 

We are going on a T hunt:

Tortoise begins with ‘t’! Provide each student with a letter ‘t’ attached to an icy pole stick. Search for the letter in the classroom, in books or in students’ names.

 

What’s in the box?

Inside the box is a tortoise mask. What animal do you think is in the box? The animal is the main character in our story. Read the factual clues to help you make a prediction.

If you would like these clues for this learning experience send me a request via email: andrea@andreahillbrick.com.au

 

Do the book:

Act out being the tortoise wearing your school bag.

Using a clothes basket move like a tortoise.

 

Create a sound scape for the story. This involves the students using musical instruments or everyday items to create sound effects for pages in the book.

 

Picture Retell:

Retell the story by sequencing the images.

Puppets:

Excite your students about the text using a tortoise puppet. The students can retell the text aloud using the puppet.

 

Text to self-connections:

When have you been brave? How did you feel? What helped you?

 

Text to self connections:

How do you feel about returning to school? What advice would you give Mr Tortoise?

 

Text to text connections:

Was the tortoise brave in this story? What was the same in the two stories? What is different? Do you know another story that had a brave character?

View the text below:

 

Innovate the text:

 

What would be a different ending to this story?

What other animals could be in the story? How would it change the story?

Can you rewrite the story as you as the main character?

What could be a different setting, problem, and resolution for Mr Tortoise?

 

Launch your 100 days of School count! Begin with a display of ten empty tens frames. Add an adhesive dot each day!

Create a survey to find out everyone’s favourite lunch at school. Graph the results.

Research the differences between a tortoise and turtle. How will you share this information?

 

Have a great start to your school year!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

NEW FOR 2021:

 

Book Club:

Have you joined yet? First teaching resource will arrive to you on the 17th January!

Check out the details by clicking on the link below.

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

 

Upcoming Webinar:  Writer’s Notebook

During the webinar Andrea will:

  • Explore key ideas related to generating and collecting ideas in a Writer’s Notebook.
  • Investigate four detailed lessons plans with images of examples
  • Provide strategies to differentiate
  • Share HHH – Hillbrick Handy Hints!

Each participant will receive a teaching resource with four detailed lesson plans and strategies to differentiate. The lessons are designed to be implemented the ‘very next day!’

Take Away Teaching Ideas #26

Harry The Dirty Dog

By Gene Zion

Pictures by Margaret Bloy Graham

It’s a family affair!

My family are the world to me! They are also a pivotal part of my business. Chelsea and Emma drive the online and design elements of my business. They are both so talented and generous. I am so blessed.

It is a thrill that my granddaughter Emma has collaborated with me to create this edition for you. Emma has just completed her third year of teaching training. As you can imagine I am so proud!

 

Harry is a white dog with black spots who hates to take a bath. One day he gets so dirty he has black fur with white spots Where’s Harry?

 

This engaging story was first published in 1956. It is an all time favourite of mine!

 

Enjoy a video of the story.

 

Watch Betty White reads the story.

 

Wonder:

I wonder why Margaret the illustrator only used four colours in the pictures.

Harry has a double letter in his name. I wonder how many words you can find with double letters.

Harry was a little dog with black spots who liked everything excepthaving a bath.  Everything is a compound word. I wonder what compound words you can find in books.

I wonder what you like to do and not like to do! Make a T chart to share your preferences.

I wonder how Harry and his family may have been feeling throughout the story.

Harry can do tricks. I wonder what tricks you can do. Make a short video to share your tricks.

I wonder if you have a story to share one time that you got very dirty!

I wonder what message you gained from the story.

 

Create:

Speech captions for Harry throughout the story.

Sound effects for the different settings in the story – train station, tip truck…

Your own story about Harry. What adventure does he get up to?

A story to show the problem and solution of this story.

A math game! Draw an outline of Harry. Collect a dice and counters. Roll the dice three times. After each roll to add the counters onto Harry. The counters are Harry’s spots. How many spots altogether?

A bird’s eye view map of Harry’s adventure. Where did he go?

An alternate route for Harry to escape from being washed.

A timeline to capture Harry’s adventure.

A procedure on how to wash a dog.

 

Investigate:

Using white paint on black cardboard and black on white cardboard to create a picture of Harry.

Washing muddy animals. Mix up some mud, dip in some plastic animals and wash in some soapy water. How did it feel? What did it smell like? What happened?

By researching an animal that you would like to have as a pet.

Other animals that have spots. What facts did you find about these animals?

By surveying your friends and family about their favourite animal with spots.

The two other books about Harry. What is the same and different?

                                               

 

This book was first published in 1956. Where do you find the publication year in a book? Investigate books in your classroom. What did you find?

Other books that the pictures are created by Margaret Bloy Graham. What did you find?

Harry plays tag with the other dogs. Investigate the number of dogs on the page.

  • How many ears altogether?
  • How many legs altogether?

What else could you count and share?

Mixing detergent and water to make bubbles.

 

Would you love a teaching resource for an awesome book emailed to you once a month?

 

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https://andreahillbrick.com.au/shop-online-resources/book-club-2/

 

 

 

Sending my best wishes to you and your families.

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #19

The Pear in the Pear Tree.

By Pamela Allen

When John and Jane went out walking what did they see? They saw a pear in the pear tree. This humorous rhyming story tells of their attempts to reach the pear.

 

 

 

 

I am sure you will agree with me that Jazz has prepared so many opportunities to explore this story across the curriculum! Jasmine O’Brien is the Learning Specialist at Portarlington Primary School, Victoria. You can tell by this edition that Jazz is passioniate about linking literature across all areas of the curriculum. We both share a passion for mathematics. I am grateful that I have the opportunity to collaborate with Jazz on a whole school mathematics initiative at her school.

On behalf of us all – thanks Jazz for sharing your highly practical and engaging teaching ideas.

 

Literacy:

Reading:

  • Punctuation (exclamation, ellipses, question marks, talking marks, full stops, hyphen)
  • Rhyming words (letter patterns and phonics)
  • Problem and solution
  • Fluency (using pictures to support reading)

Writing:

Narrative writing-

  • Onomatopoeia
  • Dialogue
  • Author study- Writer’s crafts

Mathematics:

Measurement:

  • Weight (hefting, balancing, mass)
  • Distance
  • Height
  • Informal and formal measurement

Problem solving:

  • Estimate, test, prove

Social and Personal Capabilities:

  • Team work
  • Persistence
  • Sharing

 

Teaching ideas:

In Pamela Allen’s story The Pear in the Pear Tree she cleverly uses a combination of simple sentences, questions, dialogue, punctuation, rhyming and onomatopoeia to engage her audience. This story explores desire, teamwork, problem solving, weight and luck. It is a fantastic story to unpack with students as it prompts lots of rich learning.

  1. Students to explore words for sounds. Students to play a ‘sound (onomatopoeia) heads up’. Students to hold up pictures of objects, things etc… (drum, wind, cow) above their head and their partner must make the sound for that item. The person must guess the object, thing or item. They have 30 seconds each. Most sounds correct gets to select first the card they wish to publish and make a class display for. Students to record all their sounds at the end of each round.

  2. Teacher to model how to categorise/sort rhyming words. Have students explore rhyming words in the story. Why did the author use rhyming words? What do they notice about some words when they rhyme? (the same letter patterns, blends that make a particular sound i.e. shout, out). What letter blends are different but have the same sound? (scare, air) Can you think of other words that rhyme but have different spelling patterns? Students to make a ladder of letter patterns to show as many words that rhyme as they can.

  3. Introducing problem and solutions. Write a summary using the prompts the problem was… The way the author solved the problem was…

  4. Students to write a sizzling start using onomatopoeia.

  5. Exploring secretarial skills in writing. Read Pamela Allen’s story and identify the many different types of punctuation. What does each one mean? Depending on level of learning make between 2 to 6 punctuation boxes (see below). Teacher to have students sit in a fishbowl. Give students prewritten sentences and have them sort each sentence into its correct punctuation box. Each student should explain why they chose the box i.e. this is a question because it begins with the word ‘how’ so it must end with a question mark etc… Students to then independently write sentences using their knowledge of the punctuation explored.


  6. Measurement (building mathematical vocab, connections and understanding through estimation and investigation)- Students to explore weight using informal measurement. Students to collect items from around the class. Students to draw a table with 5 columns (items, estimated heaviest, hefting heaviest, scales heaviest). See below. First lesson students to estimate and use hefting to find weight of items. Second lesson students to test their hefting with balance scales and give a reason as to why they think an item is heavier (it is longer than the other item). Another column can be added for formal measurement using scales as needed.

    Items Estimated heaviest Hefty Heaviest Balance Scales

    Heaviest

    what is the reason?

     

    Pencil and cup Pencil Cup Pencil  

     

     

  7. Have students use various items (coat hanger, string, cups, ruler, cylinder etc…) provided by the teacher to create their own balance scales. Estimate, investigate, record, explain and prove the weights of items.


  8. Measurement- weight. Students to create their own catapult. They must collect 4 items to catapult. Students to estimate which one will travel further. Students to use a 1 metre piece of wool or string taped to the floor with a drawing of a pond at the end. Can my item make it to the pond? Students to write down a yes or no for each item and a reason why they think it will or will not make it to the pond. Students to test each item.

  9. Measurement- Using the catapult from the previous lesson students to measure distance. Students to choose 4 items to catapult. Students to decide how they will measure the distance (Unifix blocks, string with pegs, counters, measuring tape). Students to estimate which item will travel the longest distance and which will travel the shortest distance. Students to test, record and discuss.

  10. Problem solving- How would you reach the pear? Put a pear in the classroom out of the reach of the students. Ask students to estimate the height of the pear (is it a student and a half high, or 4 chairs etc…) Teacher to then use a piece of string to show the actual height of the pear. Students to be given the string to compare their measurements. Students to plan how they would get the pear in a realistic and safe way. Students to write a script with a team/partner and create a puppet play to show how their characters would get the pear.

In my Literacy Shop there are some teaching ideas for Pamela Allen’s books – check them out 😊

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #18

The Heart and the Bottle

By Oliver Jeffers

 

Once there was a girl whose life was filled with all the wonder of the world around her.

Then one day something occurred that caused the girl to take her heart and put it in a safe place.

However, after that it seemed that more things were empty than before. Would she know when and how to get her heart back?

 

You can view the story here

 

Watch Oliver read the story: https://youtu.be/CeLZDwHKLjo

 

In Term 2, I had the privilege of collaborating with each PLC at Fyans Park PS in Geelong. We created a whole school author/illustrator study. Each PLC selected texts written or illustrated by Oliver Jeffers to explore and investigate with their students.

 

A big thanks to the 5/6 PLC – Abbie Walker, Alex Pink, Ali Hayes, Kirsten Young & Lauren McGill, for sharing these teaching ideas for this superb story.

  • Follow the steps to fold an origami heart. Place your heart in your own jar.
  • Vocabulary investigation – curiosity: Collect items such as a telescope, astronomy, sea animals, instruments that ignite curiosity.
  • Writer’s Notebook: The writers select one of the objects and brainstorm their questions and statements.
  • Investigate the frequency of nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs.
  • Punctuation investigation: Why did Oliver include ellipses and commas? How do we respond to these as we read?
  • Explore the meaning – ‘The heart that was put back where it came from’
  • Sentence length investigation: What type of sentences did Oliver use? Why did he vary the sentence length?
  • Illustrations investigation: What colours did Oliver select to depict the character’s feelings?
  • Feelings change: Track the character’s feelings throughout the text. Match the characters feelings to the events.
  • Investigate: Why are some think bubbles are filled with illustrations rather than text?
  • Front load: Implement a Think aloud to address the question – Does the character really put her heart in a bottle?
  • What message did you gain from this story? Discuss with peers. Did you all have the same message? What are you now thinking?
  • What happens next? Write a continuation of the story.
  • Investigate the heart – physical and emotional.
  • Create a jar of gratitude. Write the things that you grateful for and store in a jar to revisit and share.
  • Investigate and record observations about the night sky. What are you curious about? What question will you research?
  • Video yourself reading an Oliver Jeffers story. Who are you going to share the reading with? What feedback did you receive?
  • Create a bookmark that would support the reader to understand the story.
  • Create a short video to promote the story.
  • Compare and contrast the story with another publication by Oliver Jeffers.

Can you guess the book the Specialist PLC explored with all the students?

Thanks to Jodie Thomson for the photograph!

 

 

Love books by Oliver Jeffers? This teaching resource for the story ‘Stuck’ by Oliver Jeffers is designed for teachers who love to explore books across the curriculum in meaningful and engaging ways!

The resource includes:

  • Hooks to engage
  • Fun tasks to investigate letters and words
  • Opportunities to build comprehension strategies
  • Strategies to motivate writers
  • Learning experiences with strong connections to mathematics
  • Springboards for investigations

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #10

The Tiny Star

By Mem Fox and Freya Blackwood

Once upon a time, although this happens all the time, a tiny star fell to earth . . .

This touching and timeless story combines, for the first time, the talents of world-renowned author Mem Fox with the heart-warming illustrations of Freya Blackwood. These two luminaries craft a truly unique and moving story about the journey of life, to be cherished and shared for generations to come.

A special treat for me! I am collaborating with my dear friend whom I started teaching with. Elissa Jackson @lissandtrev and I had a team-teaching classroom many years ago. It was in this classroom I developed my beliefs as a teacher.



View the engaging video preview of the book HERE 



Listen to Mem and Freya talk about their book. It is so insightful! HERE



Listen to Mem Fox read the story HERE



Elissa and I have collaborated to plan these teaching ideas for you!



Reading:

This story provides the perfect opportunity to ….

  • Make predictions – Before reading the text, give the students the first line of text and ask them to illustrate the first page. The students explain their illustration and the connections to the first line of the story.
  • Consider the illustrator’s perspective – look at the illustration on the first page and discuss what Freya has included. After reading the whole text, return to the first page and revisit the illustration and hypothesise why.
  • Allow students to share their understanding of the text by retelling the story. Prior to a second reading of the story, let students know they will be retelling the story, and allow them to jot down their thinking during the second reading.
  • Explore the deeper meanings of the text – think about the meaning of the star used throughout the book – the star in the sky, on the quilt, the baby as a star
  • Grapple with some of the themes in the text:
    • Why does birth bring a community together?
    • What does it mean ‘…a life that it lived to the full?’
    • What does the author value in life?
    • How does she show that?
    • What does the illustrator value in life, how does she show that?
    • Why is it important to remember?
  • Have a look at some other books about growing old and remembering e.g. Wilfred Gordon McDonald Partridge
  • Talk about the ‘Circle of life’ – how is it depicted in The Tiny Star? How is this similar/different to The Lion King?
  • Infer the characters’ feelings. What would the characters be thinking and saying in this illustration?

the tiny star

  • What do you think about when you look at the night sky?
  • Enrich vocabulary – list the words and phrases that reflect the feelings of love – wrapped gently, took it home carefully
  • Think like an illustrator: Why has the illustrator chosen to use the colour blue so predominantly? How does it make us feel? Compare to Shaun Tan’s The Red Thing.
  • Research – What inspired Mem to write this book?

Writing:

I have used this as a mentor text for …

  • Explore sizzling starts. Look at the first line of the story – what makes it awesome? Go to the library and find 6 more awesome opening lines for a story.

the tiny star

You could just look at other books by Mem Fox or branch out into a range of texts. Keep a collection of Sizzling Starts as an anchor chart in the classroom.

  • To inspire students to share writing about themselves and their family. A family photo may be helpful to generate an idea.
  • Looking at the power of using pairs of descriptive words – rounder and rounder, caring and kind, loving and wise, loved and adored, …

Mathematics:

This is an ideal book to explore …

  • Timelines – show the events in the text on a timeline.
  • Time – what are the things you do when there is a night sky?
  • Really big numbers! How many stars are in the sky? Ask the students to make predictions, then do some research to check you answer. Brainstorm some other collections that could be really large.
  • …forever… the last line of the text is ‘forever’. How long is forever? We use the word ‘forever’ to describe a length of time – brainstorm the times you have said ‘forever’ and think about the time it described.
  • Problem solving – Freya has included many animals in the illustrations. How many can you find? How many legs are there altogether?
  • Measurement – The baby in the story grows taller and taller. Can you build a tower that is tall and another tower that is taller? How many blocks are in each tower?
  • Patterns – design and create your own quilt. What shapes and colours did you use?
  • Symmetry – draw a symmetrical star. Provide instructions to a friend to draw it too!
  • Size – use a range of materials to create a tiny star.

It was such a treat to plan learning experiences for this story – I did shed a tear or two.

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

Take Away Teaching Ideas #9

I Wish That I Had Duck Feet

I wish that I had duck feet

By Dr Seuss

A young boy weighs the pros and cons of possessing various animal appendages–such as a duck’s feet, a deer’s antlers, a whale’s spout, an elephant’s trunk, and a long, long tail–only to decide that he’s better off just being himself. A zany, insightful story that beginning readers will wish to hear again and again.

 

Such a fun story to share!

 

You can view the story HERE. 

 

Here are my top 20 teaching ideas for you! (In no particular order)

  1. Create a mobile of all the rhyming words. Use colour coding the show the rhyming words.
  2. Use instruments and everyday objects to create a sound scape to match a scene in the book
  3. Think, turn and talk: If you could have one wish from the story, which would you choose? Why?
  4. Lucky dip an animal toy from a bag. What would be your wish? Draw your idea.
  5. Using a photo of yourself had an animal feature.
  6. Make some duck feet from cardboard or material. Tie onto your ankles or shoes and experience having duck feet. What did you find out?
  7. Create a long, long tail. How can you measure your tail? How will you record the measurements?
  8. Can you write the word SPLASH as an onomatopoeia? (The formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named) Can you find some other suitable words in the book?
  9. Make a list of all the wishes from the book. Survey your friends to find out the most popular wish.
  10. Play charades to show animal movements and features.
  11. What is the purpose of the hyphen in the name Which-What-Who?
  12. Create a Y chart to describe the Which-What-Who.
  13. What do you think the message of the story is? Make a poster to share the message.
  14. Create a T chart to explore the pros and cons of all the animal features.


    Animal Feature:

    Pro:

    Con:

    Deer Horns

    Carrying lots of things with you

    Tricky to get into doorways

    Elephant Trunk

    Playing on the playground

    Washing things at home



  15. Collect images of animals and create your own animal by selecting features from different animals. What is your animal called? What would be a good story to match your animal?
  16. Create a 3D scene for one settings in the book.
  17. Collect up to fifteen words from the book and sort them as nouns, verbs and adjectives. What did you find?
  18. Select your favourite page from the book and practise reading fluently. Video your reading.
  19. Find some animal facts in the book called Actual Size by Steve Jenkins.

    Actual size
  20. Add talk and think bubbles to the pages of the book. What would be inside those bubbles?

Teaching Ideas



Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick