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Take Away Teaching ideas #28

Here We Are

Oliver Jeffers

One of my all-time favourite books and authors!

 

View the story here:

 

In this edition I have explored the book as a mentor text for writers. I have listed the trait, goal with page number and evidence within the text.

 

Ideas:

  • The topic is narrow, clear, and manageable.

 

Front Cover:            Here We Are Notes for living on planet Earth.

 

Page 3:                    It is a big globe,

                                   floating in space,

                                  on which we live.

 

  • The pictures enhance the key ideas.

 

Page 13:                 Labels on the body illustration

                                           Brain (for thinking)

                                           Heart ( to pump your blood)

 

Page 15/16:            Illustrations of the people

 

Organisation:

  • It has an introduction that is an “attention grabber”. The reader is interested in reading on.

 

Page 3:                 Well, hello.

 

Page 6:                 So let’s get started with a quick tour.

 

  • The conclusion leaves the reader with resolution.

 

Page 31:              Make sure you look after it,

                              As it all we’ve got.

 

Page 37:             You’re never alone on Earth.

 

Voice:

  • The reader feels “connected” to the writer.

 

Page 2:               *Probably not to scale

 

Page 3:                Well, hello.

 

Page 28:              Just remember to leave notes for everyone else.

 

Word Choice:

  • The words are specific and build understanding.

 

Page 13:             Labels on the illustration

 

Page 30:            7,327,450,667 and counting.

 

  • The selection of words should help the reader see, feel, hear, taste, or understand.

 

Page 8:               hot, pointy, cold, bumpy, flat, dry, wet

 

Sentence Fluency:

  • The writer chooses words that sound good, and the writing is easy to read.

 

Page 30:              It looks big, Earth.

                               But there are lots of us on here.

                               So be kind.

                              There is enough for everyone.

 

Conventions:

  • Punctuation is accurate and appropriate.

 

Ellipsis:

Page 11:                Though it can get pretty complicated

 

Page 32:             Now, if you need to know anything else

 

Presentation:

  • There is an alignment between the text and visuals.

 

Page 17:                They come in even more shapes, sizes, and colours.

 

Page 21 & 22:       Things can sometimes move slowly here on Earth.

 

Page 35:               …you can always ask someone else.

 

Have fun exploring this text with your writers!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

NEW FOR 2021:

Book Club:                                  Join Up Now!  

The second teaching resource was emailed on 17th of February 2021!

Check out the details at: https://andreahillbrick.com.au/shop-online-resources/book-club-2/

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

Take Away Teaching Ideas #20

The Wonderful Wisdom of Ants

By Philip Bunting

View the story 

 

Visit Phillip’s website: https://philipbunting.com/

 

The people I meet and collaborate with is a major bonus of my work. In this edition I have had the pleasure of collaborating with a friend from WA! We were lucky to meet at AISWA professional learning opportunities in Perth.

Sarah Lilley is passionate about all aspects related to learning and is always willing to share how she transfers new learning into her classroom.

I truly thank Sarah for collaborating with me to create these teaching ideas for you! 

 

Reading:

This book links to predicting, summarising, and making connections.

  • Predicting: Why do you think Phillip drew an ant inside the front and back cover? The labels on the ants are different why? Confirm or reject your prediction after reading the book.
  • Making connections: What objects do you use on pages 1 and 2? Where do you find them? How do you use them?
  • Predicting: Before you read pages 3 and 4: There are lots of ants on Earth. How many do you think there are?
  • Predicting: Before you read pages 7 and 8: What do you love to do? What do you not like to do? What do you think ants love to do?
  • Making connections: Pages 21 and 22: Connecting knowledge about using the recycling bins around the school with how ants naturally recycle. The idea of using a compost bin to help feed a worm farm and create better soil is also utilised by ants.
  • Summarising: Pages 22 – 26: Philip summarises the amazing feats of ants by using key words to explain the most important aspects of ant life: Love your family; Waste nothing; Always do you best for others around you.
  • Summarising: Create a matching game of terms, pictures and definitions.
  • Summarising: Create a table of what ants love and do not love. Create a table of information about yourself!
  • Making connections: Investigate another book created by Philip. Were you able to make text to text connections?

Writing:

This book lends itself to writing to inform and vocabulary.

  • Vocabulary: What would you write in the caption on page 1?
  • Factual writing: Pages 13 and 14 explore the jobs that occur in an ant colony. It highlights the use of keywords (rather than sentences) to display facts. This would link in well with HASS concepts about community members and the jobs they do. An interview with Mum and Dad, or a member of the school community, could be the final outcomes.
  • Vocabulary: Pages 17 and 18: What is odorous? aromatic? pheromones? These challenging words lend themselves to using scents in playdough on the Sensory Table. Focus on how smells evoke memories i.e. What does this citrus smell remind you of? (making lemon slice with my Nanna).
  • Vocabulary: Pages 19 and 20: The words that have a lot of syllables/claps. Omnivorous, carnivorous, herbivorous. What animals are herbivorous?
  • Vocabulary: What words would you add to your classroom word wall with your students? How would you support them to use these words as writers?
  • Factual Writing: Write your own pledge/action plan in response to the message on the last page of the book.
  • Factual Writing: Create an image of ants by using your fingerprints. What ideas have you collected for your writing? What can you now write about?
  • Factual Writing: Observe an ant farm and jot down your observations to include in a factual piece of writing.

 

Mathematics:

This is a great book to explore number, time, direction, mass, shape, and size.

  • Shape: What shapes can you see on the front cover of the book?
  • Number: What is the number on pages 3, 4 and 5?  How many zeros are in this number? What is the biggest number you have counted to?
  • Mass: On page 6 there is a picture that shows the weight of ants and humans. Heft a range of objects to find two objects of the same mass. Draw and label your objects. Weigh the objects using balance or kitchen scales.
  • Size: List words to describe the size of ants.
  • Direction: Pages 11 and 12, which explains how colonies are like villages is a great inspiration for teaching direction. It shows ants walking left and right and could be used for exploring positional language. Even though it is not a ‘birds eye view’, this page would also prompt the creation of a map of a village the students are familiar with; the classroom, ECC or school.
  • Time: Ants have powernaps. The sign says, ‘back in a minute’. What can you do in a minute? How will you record your findings?
  • Shape: The reduce – reuse – recycle symbol is three arrows. Where else do you see this symbol? How will you collect this data? How will you present your data?
  • Number: Ants have six legs. Can you find collections of 6 inside or outside? Photograph or draw your collections.
  • Number: Ants have six legs. Investigate the number of legs of other living things. How will you present your data?

 

A bonus social domain: Working as part of a team:

  • Pages 15 and 16 explain how ants work as a team. This video demonstrates how amazing ants can be when they have to traverse a gap.

 

This is such an engaging text – we thoroughly enjoyed planning these teaching ideas for you!

When you implement one of these ideas tag me in on your post! Sarah and I would love to see these ideas come alive! 😊

 

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #17

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!

By Mo Willems

 

You can view the story here

 

Jenny Kompa and I share a passion for books! Jenny and I are often chatting about our latest reading lists. I was so excited when Jenny agreed to collaborate and with her choice of book!

Thanks Jenny 😊

 

Jenny and I hope you enjoy your students love for these teaching ideas!

 

Great read aloud for younger students. They love to get involved! They get very loud & animated! The text is highly effective as an introduction to persuasive texts.

 

Find out more about Mo Willems HERE

 

Mo has made a number of videos recently called ‘Lunch Doodles’. They’re quite random in content & length but in the first one he shares his writer’s notebooks, mock-ups and drafts of some of his books and gives a pigeon drawing tutorial.

 

Check out these teaching ideas:

 

Text innovation:

Text innovation takes a text and allows the students to change characters, setting, and story elements to make a personalised version of the story.

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Truck! (end of story)

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the…(other transport)

Don’t Let the Pigeon… (so many possibilities and always a class favourite!)

What if you DID let the pigeon drive the bus? (Oh no!)

Explore speech bubbles & thought bubbles – difference & purpose.

Explore punctuation – question marks & exclamation marks. How does our voice change when we read these aloud?

What strategies does the pigeon use to attempt to persuade you to let him drive the bus?

Line debates – for and against letting the pigeon drive the bus.

Read more about line debates. Find out more about line debates at:

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/52db91b3e4b0c2e3ce0f1ce4/t/56bc4b379f72665ed6d3749e/1455180628040/Gladly-teach.pdf

Lean on the pictures. What is the pigeon doing? What happened first? What do you think is going to happen next?

Explore the pigeon’s emotions. Map out how the pigeon’s feelings change in the story. What events influence the change?

Discuss and list the character traits of the pigeon. Play charades for the other players to guess the traits.

Ignite class discussion around whether the pigeon could actually drive the bus. This may lead to an exploration of pigeons with jobs and learning all about the role of pigeons during war time.

Create some puppets and use them to retell this story.

Create your own pictures of this pigeon doing unusual tasks and add captions.

Create the word VROOM using materials that represent the sound.

Research facts about pigeons. I can recommend this website:

https://onekindplanet.org/animal/pigeon/

Mo used interesting fonts. Have you trialled using different fonts when you publish your writing? Write an awesome sentence about the book using different fonts.

What shapes did Mo use to create the illustration of the pigeon?

Follow the drawing tutorial of the pigeon HERE

Create a 3D model of a bus. What’s the mathematics about your bus? How many wheels? What colours did you use? What shapes have you used to create the bus?

Trace around the perimeter of your hand to use as the body to begin to create a pigeon.

Make a tally to calculate the most used word in the story.

Design and implement a survey to find out who would let the pigeon drive the bus.

If the Pigeon gave you five bucks (dollars) what coins could he give you? How many options are there?

 

Links to other texts:

Mo Willems Pigeon series

Mo Willems ‘Elephant & Piggie’ series (also cartoon style illustrations and speech & thought bubbles)

Oscar’s Book -Golden Book (one of Jenny’s childhood faves!)

Do Not Open This Book – Andy Lee (series)

Gary by Leila Rudge

Wheels on the Bus song

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

 

 

Take Away Teaching ideas #28

Here We Are

Oliver Jeffers

One of my all-time favourite books and authors!

 

View the story here:

 

In this edition I have explored the book as a mentor text for writers. I have listed the trait, goal with page number and evidence within the text.

 

Ideas:

  • The topic is narrow, clear, and manageable.

 

Front Cover:            Here We Are Notes for living on planet Earth.

 

Page 3:                    It is a big globe,

                                   floating in space,

                                  on which we live.

 

  • The pictures enhance the key ideas.

 

Page 13:                 Labels on the body illustration

                                           Brain (for thinking)

                                           Heart ( to pump your blood)

 

Page 15/16:            Illustrations of the people

 

Organisation:

  • It has an introduction that is an “attention grabber”. The reader is interested in reading on.

 

Page 3:                 Well, hello.

 

Page 6:                 So let’s get started with a quick tour.

 

  • The conclusion leaves the reader with resolution.

 

Page 31:              Make sure you look after it,

                              As it all we’ve got.

 

Page 37:             You’re never alone on Earth.

 

Voice:

  • The reader feels “connected” to the writer.

 

Page 2:               *Probably not to scale

 

Page 3:                Well, hello.

 

Page 28:              Just remember to leave notes for everyone else.

 

Word Choice:

  • The words are specific and build understanding.

 

Page 13:             Labels on the illustration

 

Page 30:            7,327,450,667 and counting.

 

  • The selection of words should help the reader see, feel, hear, taste, or understand.

 

Page 8:               hot, pointy, cold, bumpy, flat, dry, wet

 

Sentence Fluency:

  • The writer chooses words that sound good, and the writing is easy to read.

 

Page 30:              It looks big, Earth.

                               But there are lots of us on here.

                               So be kind.

                              There is enough for everyone.

 

Conventions:

  • Punctuation is accurate and appropriate.

 

Ellipsis:

Page 11:                Though it can get pretty complicated

 

Page 32:             Now, if you need to know anything else

 

Presentation:

  • There is an alignment between the text and visuals.

 

Page 17:                They come in even more shapes, sizes, and colours.

 

Page 21 & 22:       Things can sometimes move slowly here on Earth.

 

Page 35:               …you can always ask someone else.

 

Have fun exploring this text with your writers!

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

NEW FOR 2021:

Book Club:                                  Join Up Now!  

The second teaching resource was emailed on 17th of February 2021!

Check out the details at: https://andreahillbrick.com.au/shop-online-resources/book-club-2/

Join any time to receive all the teacher resources for each book during 2021!

Take Away Teaching Ideas #20

The Wonderful Wisdom of Ants

By Philip Bunting

View the story 

 

Visit Phillip’s website: https://philipbunting.com/

 

The people I meet and collaborate with is a major bonus of my work. In this edition I have had the pleasure of collaborating with a friend from WA! We were lucky to meet at AISWA professional learning opportunities in Perth.

Sarah Lilley is passionate about all aspects related to learning and is always willing to share how she transfers new learning into her classroom.

I truly thank Sarah for collaborating with me to create these teaching ideas for you! 

 

Reading:

This book links to predicting, summarising, and making connections.

  • Predicting: Why do you think Phillip drew an ant inside the front and back cover? The labels on the ants are different why? Confirm or reject your prediction after reading the book.
  • Making connections: What objects do you use on pages 1 and 2? Where do you find them? How do you use them?
  • Predicting: Before you read pages 3 and 4: There are lots of ants on Earth. How many do you think there are?
  • Predicting: Before you read pages 7 and 8: What do you love to do? What do you not like to do? What do you think ants love to do?
  • Making connections: Pages 21 and 22: Connecting knowledge about using the recycling bins around the school with how ants naturally recycle. The idea of using a compost bin to help feed a worm farm and create better soil is also utilised by ants.
  • Summarising: Pages 22 – 26: Philip summarises the amazing feats of ants by using key words to explain the most important aspects of ant life: Love your family; Waste nothing; Always do you best for others around you.
  • Summarising: Create a matching game of terms, pictures and definitions.
  • Summarising: Create a table of what ants love and do not love. Create a table of information about yourself!
  • Making connections: Investigate another book created by Philip. Were you able to make text to text connections?

Writing:

This book lends itself to writing to inform and vocabulary.

  • Vocabulary: What would you write in the caption on page 1?
  • Factual writing: Pages 13 and 14 explore the jobs that occur in an ant colony. It highlights the use of keywords (rather than sentences) to display facts. This would link in well with HASS concepts about community members and the jobs they do. An interview with Mum and Dad, or a member of the school community, could be the final outcomes.
  • Vocabulary: Pages 17 and 18: What is odorous? aromatic? pheromones? These challenging words lend themselves to using scents in playdough on the Sensory Table. Focus on how smells evoke memories i.e. What does this citrus smell remind you of? (making lemon slice with my Nanna).
  • Vocabulary: Pages 19 and 20: The words that have a lot of syllables/claps. Omnivorous, carnivorous, herbivorous. What animals are herbivorous?
  • Vocabulary: What words would you add to your classroom word wall with your students? How would you support them to use these words as writers?
  • Factual Writing: Write your own pledge/action plan in response to the message on the last page of the book.
  • Factual Writing: Create an image of ants by using your fingerprints. What ideas have you collected for your writing? What can you now write about?
  • Factual Writing: Observe an ant farm and jot down your observations to include in a factual piece of writing.

 

Mathematics:

This is a great book to explore number, time, direction, mass, shape, and size.

  • Shape: What shapes can you see on the front cover of the book?
  • Number: What is the number on pages 3, 4 and 5?  How many zeros are in this number? What is the biggest number you have counted to?
  • Mass: On page 6 there is a picture that shows the weight of ants and humans. Heft a range of objects to find two objects of the same mass. Draw and label your objects. Weigh the objects using balance or kitchen scales.
  • Size: List words to describe the size of ants.
  • Direction: Pages 11 and 12, which explains how colonies are like villages is a great inspiration for teaching direction. It shows ants walking left and right and could be used for exploring positional language. Even though it is not a ‘birds eye view’, this page would also prompt the creation of a map of a village the students are familiar with; the classroom, ECC or school.
  • Time: Ants have powernaps. The sign says, ‘back in a minute’. What can you do in a minute? How will you record your findings?
  • Shape: The reduce – reuse – recycle symbol is three arrows. Where else do you see this symbol? How will you collect this data? How will you present your data?
  • Number: Ants have six legs. Can you find collections of 6 inside or outside? Photograph or draw your collections.
  • Number: Ants have six legs. Investigate the number of legs of other living things. How will you present your data?

 

A bonus social domain: Working as part of a team:

  • Pages 15 and 16 explain how ants work as a team. This video demonstrates how amazing ants can be when they have to traverse a gap.

 

This is such an engaging text – we thoroughly enjoyed planning these teaching ideas for you!

When you implement one of these ideas tag me in on your post! Sarah and I would love to see these ideas come alive! 😊

 

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

Take Away Teaching Ideas #17

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!

By Mo Willems

 

You can view the story here

 

Jenny Kompa and I share a passion for books! Jenny and I are often chatting about our latest reading lists. I was so excited when Jenny agreed to collaborate and with her choice of book!

Thanks Jenny 😊

 

Jenny and I hope you enjoy your students love for these teaching ideas!

 

Great read aloud for younger students. They love to get involved! They get very loud & animated! The text is highly effective as an introduction to persuasive texts.

 

Find out more about Mo Willems HERE

 

Mo has made a number of videos recently called ‘Lunch Doodles’. They’re quite random in content & length but in the first one he shares his writer’s notebooks, mock-ups and drafts of some of his books and gives a pigeon drawing tutorial.

 

Check out these teaching ideas:

 

Text innovation:

Text innovation takes a text and allows the students to change characters, setting, and story elements to make a personalised version of the story.

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Truck! (end of story)

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the…(other transport)

Don’t Let the Pigeon… (so many possibilities and always a class favourite!)

What if you DID let the pigeon drive the bus? (Oh no!)

Explore speech bubbles & thought bubbles – difference & purpose.

Explore punctuation – question marks & exclamation marks. How does our voice change when we read these aloud?

What strategies does the pigeon use to attempt to persuade you to let him drive the bus?

Line debates – for and against letting the pigeon drive the bus.

Read more about line debates. Find out more about line debates at:

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/52db91b3e4b0c2e3ce0f1ce4/t/56bc4b379f72665ed6d3749e/1455180628040/Gladly-teach.pdf

Lean on the pictures. What is the pigeon doing? What happened first? What do you think is going to happen next?

Explore the pigeon’s emotions. Map out how the pigeon’s feelings change in the story. What events influence the change?

Discuss and list the character traits of the pigeon. Play charades for the other players to guess the traits.

Ignite class discussion around whether the pigeon could actually drive the bus. This may lead to an exploration of pigeons with jobs and learning all about the role of pigeons during war time.

Create some puppets and use them to retell this story.

Create your own pictures of this pigeon doing unusual tasks and add captions.

Create the word VROOM using materials that represent the sound.

Research facts about pigeons. I can recommend this website:

https://onekindplanet.org/animal/pigeon/

Mo used interesting fonts. Have you trialled using different fonts when you publish your writing? Write an awesome sentence about the book using different fonts.

What shapes did Mo use to create the illustration of the pigeon?

Follow the drawing tutorial of the pigeon HERE

Create a 3D model of a bus. What’s the mathematics about your bus? How many wheels? What colours did you use? What shapes have you used to create the bus?

Trace around the perimeter of your hand to use as the body to begin to create a pigeon.

Make a tally to calculate the most used word in the story.

Design and implement a survey to find out who would let the pigeon drive the bus.

If the Pigeon gave you five bucks (dollars) what coins could he give you? How many options are there?

 

Links to other texts:

Mo Willems Pigeon series

Mo Willems ‘Elephant & Piggie’ series (also cartoon style illustrations and speech & thought bubbles)

Oscar’s Book -Golden Book (one of Jenny’s childhood faves!)

Do Not Open This Book – Andy Lee (series)

Gary by Leila Rudge

Wheels on the Bus song

 

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick

 

 

 

into the forest

Take Away Teaching Ideas #7

Into the Forest

into the forest

By Anthony Browne

I have had the pleasure of collaborating with Jemima at her school and I am most appreciative of her willingness to share her teaching ideas.  Jemima introduced me to this engaging story, another book for my bookshelf.

I love Jemima’s posts

@jemluck

Reading:

This story provides the perfect opportunity to …

  • Make a prediction using the blurb at the back of the book.

into the forest

  • Label the nouns in an illustration and then ‘crack open the nouns’ by using an adjective.
  • What does poorly mean? Share your understanding.
  • Make connections with other texts, by finding out which stories the special guest characters appeared in originally
  • Ask questions, students can generate questions about the book before, during and after reading
  • Practise pausing at commas
  • Read the pictures, by searching in the background for interesting items, like beanstalks and bears
  • Analyse decisions made by the illustrator, including why some parts of the pictures are grey and some are coloured
  • Infer the character’s feelings by writing think bubbles for some illustrations
  • Compare texts by finding other books that use known characters in different ways (e.g. Stories about fairy tales told from a different characters’ point of view)
  • Retell the story by creating a story map to show the boy’s journey from his home through the forest to Grandma’s.

Writing:

I have used this as a mentor text for …

  • Creating a simple opener to a story, by using the first sentence as a mentor sentence
  • Building mystery by looking at the start of the story (both pictures and text) to analyse how the characters feels about Dad not being around
  • Exploring punctuation. There is a wide range of punctuation in this text, can you make a tally?
  • Labelling because the boy creates notes and puts them around the house, like labels
  • Modelling dialogue between two characters
  • Innovating on a text and having known characters make special appearances, e.g. Goldilocks appears in a story

Mathematics:

This is a great book is ideal to explore …

  • Shapes – go on a 2D and 3D shape hunt on each page
  • Fractions and measurement in a fruit cake recipe
  • The height of living things. Investigate the different heights of tress. Show your findings by representing the height of trees using wool or streamers.
  • Investigate the distance to travel to someone special in your family. Is it metres or kilometres?

Beyond the Text:

  • Create artworks that have some black and white parts, and some coloured parts to add emphasis to parts of the picture
  • Create a diorama setting for a character to walk through
  • Explore perspective in drawings, particularly on the page when the boy hugs his grandma
  • Bake some treats to share with others in your community
  • Select one illustration from the text and role play what happened before and after the illustration
  • Shadows were evident in the illustrations. Go outside and explore shadows. Take photographs or draw images.
  • Make signs to display as Anthony did in this book.

Would you like some more teaching ideas? The resource A-Z of reading ideas will be helpful!

Enjoy and take care,

Andrea

Andrea Hillbrick